Benito Mussolini Dictatorship

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“Let us have a dagger between our teeth, a bomb in our hands, and an infinite scorn in our hearts.” - Benito Mussolini. A dictatorship is the absolute control of a country in governance by one individual, formally known as a dictator. Absolute control of Italy, with the formation of a totalitarian state is a perfect example of dictatorial power. Benito Mussolini was appointed the 27th prime minister of italy in 1923, and by 1925, he named himself dictator, and implemented fascism into the new Italian totalitarian government. This lead to the suppression all other political parties. Mussolini’s reign of power lasted into World War II, where he decided to side with Nazi-backed Germany, in the formation of the Axis Powers. Benito Mussolini ascended …show more content…
Italians began to take to Mussolini’s views, such that they had movements to ascend him to power. The largest of these movements consisted of 30,000 plus supporters flooding Rome. This movement was formally known as the March of Rome, in which patrons demanded that Mussolini be appointed Prime Minister by King Victor Emmanuel III ("Italian Fascist Party."). Mussolini made it clear that all he sought was to solely rule Italy. With a perfect opportunity laid out in front of him, Mussolini was able to quickly gain power through the exploitation of vulnerable, war struck citizens living with a severed economy. Easily trusting Mussolini was one of the worst mistakes the italian people made, granting absolute power to an anti-semitic fascist who run Italy right into a second world war. This is likely the most prominent cause of Mussolini’s quickly attained dictatorial …show more content…
By definition, Fascism opposes Socialist views and the democratic views that follow suit with them. The new Italian government was ruled by the minority as opposed to the democratic majority that had previously had the largest say ("What is Fascism"). For this same reason, Mussolini saw a need to align himself with the minority ruler of another world power, Adolf Hitler. Conjunction with Hitler was one of the worst things to happen to Italy. Not only did this cause more problems in World War II, but Hitler’s anti-semitic views quickly rubbed off on Mussolini, and could be seen throughout Italy after the introduction of German influence ("Benito Mussolini." : ABC-CLIO). This was all part of the complete control that came out of Mussolini’s rule, which was inclusive of the control of the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural lives of most citizens. This complete control meant that Mussolini had no true opposition, or balance of power to keep him in line ("Italian Fascist Party."). An overly controlling leader, in many cases, may run a country into the ground. Although Mussolini built upon the Italian state he started with, he ultimately caused irreversible problems that could only be solved by foreign

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