College Credit Benefits

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College Credit in High School: Beneficial or Detrimental? Every year, over one million high school students take courses for college credit (Jacobs). This occurs through two processes: AP credit and Dual-credit. Both of these begin with a student taking classes in a particular subject, but they differ in how credit is earned. With dual credit, credit is given if the student receives a passing grade in the class, while AP requires students to take a nationally standardized test to determine if credit has been earned. The availability of these programs has increased the number of students that have upon entering college; the average student a the University of Northern Iowa enters with 7.4 college credits (Buzynski 117). With this number, …show more content…
Both sides give convincing arguments for their positions. There are well documented benefits to earning credit in high school, but opponents of the program offer significant evidence that these benefits should be taken with the proverbial grain of salt. After looking at both sides of this argument, I do not believe that either side is entirely correct. The positives are worthwhile, and are supported by research, but the negatives are also very real, though I feel that they are not as bad as they are presented as being. In the example with transfer credit, credits that do not transfer are labeled worthless. This is not the case, as students will have learned about the subject, and learning something is never worthless. The experience may also make the class easier when they retake it in college. In addition to this, the course will have given the student limited experience in a college course. Given this, I believe that awareness and prudence should be exercised when considering college credit in high school, with awareness being knowledge of the pros and cons of each side of the argument and prudence being the wisdom to make a decision based on this knowledge. Knowledge of both sides of this argument can help students and their parents to make better choices about these …show more content…
For the proponents of college credit in high school, Johnson’s story can serve as a cautionary tale to remind people that there are downsides to entering with to many credits. It can also remind students and parents that the shortened time to graduation is futile if you do not graduate in the first place. For the opponents of these programs, the research and statistics showing the benefits of a reasonable number of credits, such as an increased GPA and a decreased drop-out rate, can alleviate any tensions or concerns they may have about earning college credit in high school. These two views seem to lead to a balance: taking some college credits, but not enough to cause problems later on. This view is shared by Professor Johnson. At the cessation of our interview, he asked me how many credits I had entered with. I told him the number, eight credits from two courses, and he responded “Good, that’s a reasonable number.(Johnson)” Regardless of the number, the best practice is to learn the benefits and detriments of the issue. Making a choice based upon a person’s specific capabilities, plans, and circumstances will always give a better result than blindly going one way or the

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