Beliefs And Values In The Early Years Learning Framework

770 Words 4 Pages
An educator’s beliefs and values stem from their cultural identity which is a sociocultural perspective gained over a lifetime of social and cultural experience. These predetermined values surrounding gender, sexuality, social economic status (SES) and cultural diversity, influence the way the curriculum is enacted commencing from birth within the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) until Year 12 via the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). An educator that considers the colour blue as masculine and pink as feminine, may unintentionally hand out pink stickers to girls, reinforcing the gender stereotype by way of the hidden curriculum “what children learn without teachers realising it” (Blaise & Nuttall, 2011, …show more content…
The Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) is based on principles, practice and learning outcomes with a strong focus on the learning environment and surroundings which are implemented according to the educator’s understanding of the curriculum and their own philosophy (reinforced by beliefs and values) (Blaise & Nuttall, 2011, pp.103-105; Robson, 2004, p. 205; Strong-Wilson & Ellis, 2007, pp. 40-43. Beliefs and values held by the educator can be intentionally or unintentionally displayed in the learning environment by way of materials, furniture placement and play. These beliefs have an impact on the way students learn within the classroom or nursery environment. Each space is organised addressing curricula requirements and the educators own …show more content…
83). The ACARA framework encompasses learning areas, general capabilities and cross curriculum priorities all in which are influenced by the values and beliefs of the educator implementing them. Radich and Goodwin (2015) discuss cultural competence and how educators’ competence and identity is influenced by their life experience, no matter how broad or narrow. These life experiences form beliefs and values which can unintentionally influence the way the curriculum is enacted. For example some teachers’ strongly believe in leaving home life at home once a student enters the classroom. This could be interpreted by students as the educator unwilling to accept cultural diversity and expect the dominant culture to be followed, possibly causing disengagement. Educators unwilling to reflect on their philosophies, risk reinforcing negative stereotypes based on their own beliefs (Department of Education and Training, Office of Multicultural Interests, 2009, p. 8). This can cause added apprehension for students when controversial or contentious topics are discussed, fostering student secretiveness, which in turn disrupts the learning process (Giugni as cited in Hedges, 2011, p.

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