Beccaria's Theory Of The Criminal Justice Theory

Amazing Essays
Register to read the introduction… Beccaria wrote a book, On Crimes and Punishment, which was first published in 1764 (Brown, 2004). Brown (2004) explains of Beccaria’s book, “In his book, Beccaria noted, "For a punishment to attain its end, the evil which it inflicts has only to exceed the advantages derivable from the crime." In other words, punishment should not be excessive; it should fit the crime” (p. 1). The criminal justice system of today was built off the foundation of Beccaria’s book, which outlined what the system should be like (Brown, 2004). Classical thinkers like Beccaria were instrumental in setting in place a system that would hand out punishment as well as establish laws for the people to abide by. Classical theorist believed that punishment that followed the commission of a crime was more just and useful (Brown, 2004, p. 1). This means that if an offender was punished following a crime that he or she committed they would be less likely to commit a criminal act again. Classical theorist believed that swift and just punishment was the key to deterrence. A criminal would think hard before committing a crime because they would have to weigh out the benefit versus the …show more content…
It is not something that can easily be forsaken or turned away from in a single attempt. For this type of criminal there must be an advanced psychological therapy and counseling to help the individual see the root of their issues. They have to have the support and backing from family and friends if they want to be successful in being introduced back into society. For those individuals that are not in the penal system, but are tempted to commit a crime there has to be methods of prevention. There are programs that help youth such as D.A.R.E and mentoring programs that help to steer these youth in the right direction. There has to always be an open outlet that our youth or even older individuals can turn to when they feel tempted to do the unthinkable. If there are more outlets to prevent the nature of crime, the need for crime will decrease as well. There has to be a community effort to keep the rate of crime as low as possible. Rational thinking is something that every individual has at the time of birth, but not all thoughts are rational. This is …show more content…
B. (2004). Contrasting Schools of Thought in Criminology. Retrieved from http://www.sheldensays.com/new_page_5.htm McKean, L., & Ransford, C. (2004). CURRENT STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING RECIDIVISM. Retrieved from http://www.impactresearch.org/documents/recidivismexecutivesummary.pdf Siegel, L. J. (2011). Criminology: The Core (4th ed.). University of Massachusetts, Lowell: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire. (2002). Criminological Theory Summaries. Retrieved February 22, 2013, from

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    This was to be enforced by the state in order to prevent conflict that may arise through the natural self-concerned tendencies. Thomas Hobbes stated that crime could still occur and that the benefit of committing a crime should be outdone by the punishment. This would be applied as a form of deterrence. (Onwudiwe, I. et al., 2005). “It is better to prevent crime than to punish it” (Beccaria, 1764/1963:93).…

    • 1195 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    I feel this way because there are crimes in this would that if anybody thought of doing that being sentenced to death should cross there mind. The utilitarian theory is a perfect example of how I feel capital punishment should be looked at. I feel this way, because of the reasons behind the theory. Since it is forward-looking and hopes to deter further criminals from committing the same act it shows that the main focus is not the killing itself, but the future criminals who might commit the same act. Anyone can give their own opinion on which theory is morally right, but when it comes down to which theory is best for society utilitarian theory is by far the best.…

    • 817 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Reflection. Available: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/reflection?s=t. Last accessed 25th September 2013. N/A. (N/A).…

    • 2245 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Juvenile Delinquency Thesis

    • 2503 Words
    • 11 Pages

    Juvenile Delinquency is a very big problem today and I believe that not enough is being done to curb juvenile crime. There needs to be stronger penalties for crimes they are committing. There needs to be programs set in place to deal with Juvenile emotional problems before the kids resort to criminal activity. There needs to more activities within communities so the children don’t resort to criminal activity as a form of recreation. I think there needs to be some mentoring programs set up so difficult kids have good quality role models to look up to.…

    • 2503 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Case Study Psychology

    • 1090 Words
    • 5 Pages

    (n.d.). Correlational Research. Retrieved from About Education: http://psychology.about.com/od/researchmethods/a/correlational.htm Christensen, D. (2013). Case Studies. Retrieved from Shoreline.edu: http://www.shoreline.edu/dchris/psych209/Documents/Case%20Studies.pdf Crane, J., & Hannibal, J.…

    • 1090 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Bullying And Antibullying

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages

    MasterFILE Premier, Retrieved from ezlib.gatewaycc.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.ezlib.gatewaycc.edu:2048/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=108991090&site=ehost-live. (Crothers & Kolber, 2004) We are advocated of a paradigm shift within society concerning the process of social normalization. Jones (2014b) argued that combating bulling requires a change in the normalizing process of schooling. He believes that bullying behaviors develop because of the structures of…

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    (2005). The ins and outs of homeschooling: The determinants of parental motivations and student achievement. Education and Urban Society, 37(3), 307-335. doi: 10.1177/0013124504274190 Fox, C., & Harding, J. D. (2005). School shootings as organizational deviance. American Sociological Association, 78(1), 68-97.…

    • 2387 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These offenders commit crimes because they believed that benefits from the crime outweighs the fear of the punishment if they are ever caught. In other words, these individuals weigh out the possible costs and…

    • 930 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Shame is something that one can carry on his or her back, and it can be presumed necessary. Having shame means to have the sense of restraint against offending others. If everyone in the world wanted to do whatever they want and think that, ‘it’s okay’ then wouldn’t the world be in chaos? In the article “Shame is Worth a Try” by Dan M. Kahan, he provides proof how using shaming as a tool can be effective, cheap and most importantly a humane way for imprisonment. Of course, there are other alternatives to punish someone for their crimes that people commit and government already has determined by their rules and laws.…

    • 877 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    When a child does something wrong, you talk to the child find out why they did it. Then you punish the child in the way you see fit (spanking, taking something away, etc.) Until they learn to not do it again, but you also have to do this all with love. If the criminal justice system would take this into consideration they would have less problems. To be able to give punishment, but to be able to rehabilitate that person would be the best thing for society, and the criminal justice…

    • 445 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays