Analysis: The Battle Of The Bulge

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The Battle of the Bulge actually began in the year 1944 towards the end of July, but officially occurred December 16, 1944 through January 25, 1954. The battle was the biggest German Offensive they ever conducted. The battle took place in Belgium, France, and Europe. The United States suffered the highest amount casualties of the Allied Forces. The Germans lost so much that they were unable to replace them for a long time. This battle had multiple names such as the Battle of the Ardennes and Operation Watch on the Rhine. The Germans lost this war, but inflicted heavy casualties upon the Allied Forces. The Germans also took a heavy toll, one that almost completely eliminated there armed forces. The name Battle of the Bulge was created …show more content…
The Operation Bodenplatte was an attempt by Germany to destroy the American and Allied air assets. The Battle of the Buldge slowed and Germany’s army to include the Waffen-SS would use this point in time to continue their advance through the country. The operation was supposed to begin on December 16th of 1944, but due to horrible weather it was postponed until New Year’s Day. Not all of Germany’s forces knew about the operation so a lot of friendly fire casualties ensued. The operation achieved some surprise and tactical success, but was ultimately a failure. A great many Allied aircraft were destroyed on the ground but replaced within a week. Allied aircrew casualties were quite small, since the majority of Allied losses were empty planes sitting on the ground. The Germans, however, lost many pilots that they could not readily replace. The German offensive was considered to be a success by many historians of World War …show more content…
They did not have to defend all of the Western line of Europe. The west side of Europe front lines were shortened due to Allied forces setting up close to Germany’s heartland. Because of this supply problems weren’t too big of a deal even though the Allied forces had effective control or the air. Germany had a huge hard line communications network. This was a good thing for them because they didn’t have to rely on radios anymore. The Allied forces had a system called Ultra that could capture and decrypt Germany’s radio communications. It was given that name by British military intelligence in 1941. The system could break high level encrypted radio and tele printer communication. The system would become the standard for western intelligence agencies. At the time, the British security classification of class didn’t go higher than Secret so it was designated Ultra Secret or just Ultra. The information it was handling at almost real time. Later on during the Japanese war the American would further the capabilities of Ultra, changing the name to Magic. Even though Most of Germanys cipher communications were encrypted by another machine called Enigma was not unbreakable. World War 2 gave rise to many encryption machines such as the Lorenz SZ 40/42, Hagelin, PURPLE, and the JN-25. Bletchley Park an official historian of British Intelligence during the war was quoted as saying

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