Barry Scheck Case

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Barry Scheck worked his way up the ladder of the law field slowly, but surely. Beginning in 1987, Scheck was the personal lawyer for Hedda Nussbaum. Through rigorous work, blood, sweat and tears Scheck got all charges dropped against Nussbaum and then got Joel Sternberg, her abuser, arrested in criminal court as well as sued in civil court. Then in 1995 Scheck joined the O.J. Simpson trial. Earning him large amounts of publicity. Scheck was the DNA examiner for the O.J. case.He crossed the LAPD criminalist Yamauchi. Schecks cross of Yamauchi helped turn the case around by pinpointing improper evidence collection by the LAPD. He helped the rest of the “Dream Team” get Simpson acquitted of the double murder of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron …show more content…
Barry Scheck helped co-found the Innocence project which helps the wrongly convicted be exonerated. “The Innocence Project, founded in 1992 by Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld, is a national litigation and public policy organization dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals through DNA testing and reforming the criminal justice system to prevent future injustice.” (“Innocence’’) The Innocence Project helped free 341 wrongly convicted people. Of the 341, sadly only 147 of the real perpetrators have been found and convicted. Through using DNA testing they have helped show how common wrongful convictions are. The Innocence Project uses various resources and many lawyers to prove convictions incorrect. Although despite the clearly indisputable evidence against someone.It is still very hard to present DNA to a jury due to the fact that not everyone in a jury is fully educated and complexDNA facts will either go in one ear and out the other or other the jurys head. DNA evidence may include many critical factors to a case but it can only be presented in simplified forms or not presented at all due to the confusion and frustration it could cause the jury. Members of the jury in the Simpson trial said that the overload of complex DNA evidence lost them and they had trouble following the trial when the prosecution presented their case. Scheck however, is able to relay the …show more content…
DNA testing is now very common in law practices and is sometimes required in cases. Without DNA testings growth in popularity we would not have necessary things in law, such as rape kits and gel electrophoresis testing. 30 states now have post-exoneration compensation for he wrongly convicted, 50 have statutory access to post-conviction testing, 15 have implemented comprehensive eyewitness identification reform, and 23 have record interrogations statewide along with robust preservation biological evidence laws. Theses laws have been implanted after wrongful conviction exonerations soared thanks to the Innocence Project. 14 years in prison is the average spent by the wrongly convicted felon, some have even spent time on death row and were thankfully exonerated before their execution. With help of the Innocence Project “A man who spent almost 25 years in prison for a murder he said he did not commit walked out of a courtroom a free man Thursday after Brooklyn prosecutors told a judge they could no longer stand by a conviction made from a "systemic failure.”” (Keshner and Denney). The Innocence Project has had profound affects on America and its judicial system. With the ever changing laws and new scientific breakthroughs every day, it has been getting easier and easier to only get the correct people

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