Barn Burning Point Of View Analysis

Superior Essays
Register to read the introduction… One theme in particular is the theme of Sarty’s search for peace. Relating back to the courtroom case, Sarty is loyal to his father. His loyalty to his father brings only violence within his family and conflict within himself. Sarty finds no escape from the vicious environment he is surrounded in until they arrive at Major de Spain’s house. At this point the point of view shifts in and out between Sarty’s thoughts and the narrator. “Hit’s big as a courthouse he thought quietly; with a surge of peace and joy…They are safe from him. People whose lives are a part of this peace and dignity are beyond his touch…the spell of this peace and dignity rendering even the barns and stable and cribs which belong to it impervious to the puny flames he might contrive…Maybe he will feel it too. Maybe it will even change him now from what maybe he couldn’t help but be. ” (Faulkner 159). Sarty believes at this point he will find peace at last, he has escaped violence, and that his father will change. He believes his father will see that the house is too magnificent to destroy. However, the size of the house does not faze his father. Only a few moments later Abner purposely steps in horse manure, walks into the house, and soils an expensive rug. Faulkner’s use of point of …show more content…
Point of view helps the reader to learn who the characters are and the reasons behind their actions, provides a better insight to the themes of the story, and supports plot development. Without the unique use of point of view it would be very difficult to understand the story because "the narrator can do for Sarty what the young Sarty cannot: he understands Abner's anti-social behavior, his anger...can tell the truth about Abner's fires..." (Yunis 6). The use of point of view in this intricate form provides deeper insight to the story as a

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Argument #2: When the family moves to a new place for work, the large house represents truth and justice which then gives Sarty a false sense of hope that his father has moved past the burning of the barn. A. The expensive rug which had been soiled by Sarty’s father is his was way of damaging something that has always been unfairly denied to him such as comfort and opportunity. B. In the second trial, Sarty’s father, Abner, is given less of a punishment for damaging the expensive rug he once tried to “fix”.…

    • 417 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    His loyalty shifts over the course of the story, beginning with a desire to protect and defend his family and then ending with a need to do as much right as he can in the face of his father’s destruction. In the first paragraph, Faulkner describes Mr. Harris, the man who accuses Snopes, as Sartoris’ father’s enemy, and for a brief moment, Sartoris thinks similarly, “Our enemy he thought in that despair; ‘ourn! mine and hisn both! He’s my father” (citation). Even after this display of unity, when the family is leaving the courthouse, Snopes strikes the mules pulling the carriage with “two savage blows” (citation).…

    • 1471 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Throughout a substantial part of his life, Amir has been trying to convince himself that leaving Kabul and burying the memories of his past would absolve him of his shame. However, the image of his best friend 's rape relentlessly reemerges in Amir 's thoughts, marring any joy and peace Amir experiences. Growing up in a society that has a rigid and unbending…

    • 1436 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Barn Burning”: Who Is the Real Hero? In the short story “Barn Burning” by William Faulkner, Sarty is made out to be the real hero by growing strong through family value and short life experiences his father drags him through. Sarty seems to support and have faith in his family as well as going to the extreme of lying for his father. He has learned the importance of blood shared by relatives, but at the same time knows in his heart right from wrong, which includes telling the honest truth. Even with all the conflict that is surrounded by the family Sarty must decide what is best for him in life.…

    • 712 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    More specifically, the turning point between whether family loyalty or justice weighs more on Sarty’s conscience. Towards the beginning of the work, Sarty is extremely loyal to family. It is not necessarily clear whether that was entirely due to his father’s influence, or whether there was a part of Sarty that believed family loyalty was more important than anything else. It is when Sarty decides to leave his family as his father burns the De Spain barn (and potentially gets shot in the process) that it is clear that justice weights a lot more on Sarty’s conscience than anything else. In a work entitled “A Critical Survey of Short Fiction” the authors highlight that decision by stating “Specifically, he must decide whether to support his father’s crime through silence or to betray the familial bond and warn DeSpain.” Every time his father committed a crime up until the climax of the story, Sarty had remained quiet as seen in the courtroom scene at the beginning of the story.…

    • 1341 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Like Oedipus, Joe Keller’s tragic spiral leads to a climax in which he finally accepts the answer of his fate and admits that his actions affected not only his family, but “all my sons,” (Miller 68) and he pays the ultimate price. Joe, who defends his decision to save his business and his family’s future by shipping out the cracked cylinder heads by saying “[he] did it for [Chris]” (Miller59). Joe is just a common man who feared not being able to provide for his son. The readers can pity Joe because he lost everything that is important to him at this point. Chris’ love and approval is what was important to Joe.…

    • 1075 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    In all of Miller’s works the relationship between father and son is a crucial one because it focuses on inherited values and assumption, so is in Death of a salesman. Willy searches for a father’s approval throughout his life. The life of his father is his fantasy,that he wants to attain. Similarly Willy’s sons are trapped by their father’s fantasy, which is more hollow for them. It shows that culture of commercial and industrial civilisation, commanded by capitalist economy, plays havoc with the warmth of human relations in family and society.…

    • 1894 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    We would’ve helped him,” (Salesman Requiem). After his initial bout of anger however, Happy begins to jump to his father’s defense when Biff starts to make negative comments. Happy also decides to stay in the city instead of going with his brother so that he can prove to people that Willy was a good man and he did not die in vain. This is practically how Happy behaved throughout the play in respect to Willy. Happy always seeme to be looking for his dad’s approval, he even dedicated his life to being like his dad.…

    • 795 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    George buys the nursery because of an internal struggle to provide for his children for at the beginning he said “nothing is too good for our children” (14). When the children receive the nursery they are elated which boosts George’s self esteem and his confidence in his ability to lead the household. Purchasing the house and the nursery validated his belief that he was the head of the household. It confirmed to the reader that George would do anything to make his children happy. Combining his authority over his family with the happiness of his children allowed him to feel content with his life.…

    • 1392 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Do not go gentle into that good night. Here, it can be understood that Thomas is sad for his father’s nearing death, but encouraging him to curse him. The author believes to be cursed by his father would reveal any sign of rage, fire and therefore life he may still have despite his dying condition; from that, possibly reflecting the strength his father held while he was living. Thomas compares his father’s life to that of “wise men” (line four),“good men” (line seven), “wild men” (line ten) and “grave men”(line thirteen, stanza five). These men, in Thomas’s eyes, live full and worthwhile lives and are not ready to die, feeling there is more to live for when death approaches.…

    • 762 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays