British Imperial War Analysis

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APPROPRIATION OF IMPERIAL WARFARE

During the entirety of the nineteenth century, the British Empire embarked upon many imperial wars under the pretense of spreading civilization and prosperity. Their imperial wars were launched everywhere across the world such as Asia, Africa, Australia and New Zealand, and even in Ireland. Their reasoning behind most of their military campaigns was to prevent barbarism and spread their righteous civilized manners to everywhere they go. The British Empire developed a viewpoint of superiority over non-European nations during this era and developed the sense of white supremacy over the indigenous populations subjugated to their imperial wars. The British have demonstrated a correlation between, imperial
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India was pertinent in making trade with the local tribes as well as getting opium into China, even going to war for it. The British also used their imperial status to strip India of their natural resources while the white British colonists lived in luxury on a higher elevation, while the indigenous population suffered from lack of said resources. The aftermath of the British Empire’s greediness led to the Mutiny of 1857 that slowly built up over the previous decades from small mutinies and inequality. After the Sepoys had been captured and executed, the British furthers their race classification even further by designating the Indian men as martial or non-martial. The divide between martial and non-martial set the racial hierarchy to a new standard. This new set of principles the British concocted after the Indian mutiny was intended to separate the more loyal Indian troops and those that cause problems for the empire. The India colony was also put completely under control of the British crown. Under British colonial rule, the Indian people faced many more injustices under the oppression of the crown such as forced labor, lack of resources, inequality among the different hierarchies of citizens, …show more content…
The Boers were given the opportunity to submit to the new British imperial influence that was spreading in their regions. This led to the mix of conflict and the start of the Boer war. The prisoners of the Boer war were treated significantly better than prisoners from the results of other imperial wars. While their camp systems needed work, they did realize that their system was “in need for (of) further effort on their behalf.” The fact that there was an effort show the effort to attempt to appeal to the civilized unity between the two parties with European descent. The comparison between the Boer prisoners of this time compared to those of another imperial war by the British is astonishing. The Boer prisoners were not necessarily in the best conditions, but their situation was an attempt to try and make them feel more comfortable despite the influx of riots and diseases that were present. The Zulu, which also inhabited the lands on the southern parts of Africa were not met in the same tones that they later did with the Boer settlers. The Zulu war of 1879 earned them a spot as one of the esteemed martial races with the way that they fought. However, they were met in the field with the brutal force of Gatling guns from the British so they still do not get to endeavor in the same privileges that the Boer’s would. During this time, businesses profited off of the expense of the image

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