Bandura And Rotter's Social Cognitive Theory

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In the third stage of the behaviorist school of thought we have the neo-neo behaviorist who are also known as socio-behaviorist. Sociobehaviorism began around the 1960’s and lasted until 1990. The leading figures in socio-behaviorism were Albert Bandura and Julian Rotter who incorporate a cognitive approach to the study of behavior. Although Bandura and Rotter were considered behaviorists, they were different from Skinner and other behaviorists before them in that they focused on cognitive processes and observed the behavior of human subjects in interaction. Both Bandura and Rotter *believed in the Social Cognitive theory, which was “an explanation of how people learn to become self-regulated learners through the interactive effects of their …show more content…
Therefore, “when an external reinforcer alters behavior, it does so because the person is consciously aware of the response that is being reinforced and anticipates receiving the same reinforcer for behaving in the same way the next time the situation arises” (Duane P. Schultz & Sydney Ellen Schultz, pg. 254, 2015). Some of the major components or concepts of Bandura’s social cognitive theory were learning (which involved vicarious reinforcement), triadic reciprocal causation, human agency, self-regulation, models or the idea of observational learning, self-efficacy, and behavior modification. (Should I explain some of these ideas? If so…). With learning Bandura believed that people could learn all kinds of behavior even if they do not directly experience reinforcement. He thought individuals could learn though vicarious reinforcement, which was “Bandura’s notion that learning can occur by observing the behavior of other people, and the consequences of their behavior, rather than …show more content…
These real world examples could also be applied and could be easily measured. Some other strengths were that it was objective, and allows for precise laboratory methods, and had a great research record. It also took into account the concerns with important social human behaviors. Specifically for Bandura his theory was “responsive to the current intellectual climate that focuses on internal cognitive variables and is applicable to real-world issues” (Duane P. Schultz & Sydney Ellen Schultz, pg. 257, 2015). The social cognitive theory is also an open theory that allows for change, and it also focused on theoretical issues that were rather important (such as, the stability of behavior and the role of rewards in learning). Another strength, particularly for Rotter was that his research was very “rigorous and controlled” and “he defined his concepts with precision that makes them amenable to experimental testing” (Duane P. Schultz & Sydney Ellen Schultz, pg. 260,

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