Bacons Rebellion: Bacon's Rebellion In North America

Amazing Essays
Register to read the introduction… They also caused an exodus of people who believed differently from them and were in the colony. This exodus led to the creation of Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire. Roger Williams founded Rhode Island when he was exiled for speaking out against the Puritans on October 9th, 1635. The Puritans also started the larger flow of people to …show more content…
(1675-1676) Bacon's Rebellion: Bacon's Rebellion was an uprising in 1676 in the Virginia Colony in North America, led by a 29-year-old planter, Nathaniel Bacon. It was the first rebellion in the American colonies in which discontented frontiersmen took part; a similar uprising in Maryland would take place later that year. About a thousand Virginians (including former indentured servants, poor whites and poor blacks) rose up in arms against the rule of Virginia Governor William Berkeley. Berkeley had recently refused to retaliate for a series of Indian attacks on frontier settlements. This prompted some to take matters into their own hands, attacking Native Americans, chasing Berkeley from Jamestown, Virginia, and ultimately torching the …show more content…
In the decades before the war, revivalism taught people that they could be bold when confronting religious authority, and that when churches weren’t living up to the believers’ expectations, the people could break off and form new ones. Through the Awakening, the Colonists realized that religious power resided in their own hands, rather than in the hands of the Church of England, or any other religious authority. After a generation or two passed with this kind of mindset, the Colonists came to realize that political power did not reside in the hands of the English monarch, but in their own will for self-governance. By 1775, even though the Colonists did not all share the same theological beliefs, they did share a common vision of freedom from British control. Thus, the Great Awakening brought about a climate, which made the American Revolution

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    But it had some spiritual dryness among believers. Religion was considered to be a past time where people followed this blindly without putting their heart and soul in it. Few years later, there was a spiritual revival in both England and America which is known as Great Awakening. Great Awakening led to a major change in religion where America prepared for its War of Independence. People became…

    • 480 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    During the sixteenth and seventeenth century, there were upheavals throughout Britain from religious changes. Many wanted to break away from the wandering poor and escape the persecution that come with rejecting the European church. Those who rejected the church, mainly Puritans, fled to North America and formed their own colony. With this new colony that the claimed as their own they were able to promote their beliefs, such as there was only predestination and life were run by the Bible. They also had the view as that their colony was settled with a purpose, a city on a hill.…

    • 1101 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The American Revolution

    • 1922 Words
    • 8 Pages

    These events started with the Stamp Act of 1765 that led to physical violence, intimidation, and even mob violence to impede the collection of the stamp tax. The British had just concluded a 7-year war that left a massive national debt, which led Brittan to see the colonies as a source of untapped revenue. Many colonists saw this as unconstitutional because they lacked representation in the parliament that had imposed this new tax. After the Tea Act of 1765 had been repealed the Chancellor of the Exchequer proposed a new act, Townshend Revenue Act. Under his proposed act a number of goods where taxed in order to raise revenue to pay the salaries of the colonial governors.…

    • 1922 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This armed rebellion began when the governor of Virginia, William Berkley refused to cut off his friendly ties with the Native Americans, even after a series of savage Indian attacks on the frontiersmen. This lead to 29 year old planter, Nathaniel Bacon and his 1,000 followers to revolt; such tensions arose because many of the rebels were frontiersmen who had been forced into the backcountry in search of…

    • 562 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Anne Hutchinson Dbq

    • 1705 Words
    • 7 Pages

    the monarchy was restored, the ANglican Church came back, and Charles II gave Carolina to English supporters Pequot War-the Pequot Indians and New Netherland controlled the fur trade and wampum together. in 1637, the settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts attacked a Pequot village. the Pequot resistance was over at the end of 1637 King Philip’s War- In 1657, three Wampanoag indians were executed and their leader King Philip was almost arrested for the death of a Christian Indian. Later, more Wampanoags were shot for robbery and this started the war. The Indians invaded New England and killed a twentieth of the colonists but England cut off food to them and sold many to slavery while the rest escaped to New York and Canada.…

    • 1705 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The native americans soon realized that more english were going to arrive. In order to protect what they had, the native americans struck back, which led to an uprising in 1622. Throughout the years, more uprisings, battles, and wars took place. For example, in 1637, the Pequot War was fought between the English in the Massachusetts Bay colony and the Pequot indians. Another example is King Phillip’s war, that was fought as Indian attempt to drive out English settlers.…

    • 535 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Between the early 18th century to the early 19th century, the common people began to drift away from the established churches in the colonies, primarily the congregationalist church. This rejection of the established church systems lead people to form their own religious path. People claimed that they had been “reborn” and were now “new lights” looking to pursue their religious freedoms. This idea greatly challenged the religious elites of the time because more and more people were becoming preachers, and people began to see everyone as being “equal in the eyes of God”. This influenced the internal revolution because religion went from something that was once entirely run by an elite group of religious leaders to something that any individual could pursue.…

    • 1044 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The first year of the first fighting the British were confused on whether or not they were part of the war and the colonial forces made the entire territory of the American colonies a battleground. April 1775 the British withdrew from Concord and Lexington where the Americans had victory over the army of General Thomas Gage in Boston. The patriots had disadvantages because they suffered in the battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775. While searching for the military efforts the…

    • 643 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As a result, people left England and went to Colonial America. In conclusion, there are three main reasons of why so many people moved to colonial America. The first reason is because England's overpopulation forced people off. Another reason is that African American people came and were enslaved by colonists. Also, impecunious people wanted more ownership of terrain.…

    • 407 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Some may say “The shot heard ’round the world” began the American War of Independence On the night of August 26, 1765, an assault on Thomas Hutchinson, chief justice and lieutenant governor of Massachusetts was a small episode in a series events that launched a half-century of protest and political upheaval throughout the Western world. This historic era that came to be known as the Age of Revolution. The true crisis began in 1760 when George III claimed the throne of Great Britain. No one on either side of the Atlantic envisioned that within two decades Britain’s American colonies would separate from the empire in a brutal uprising. The government in London wanted to make British rule effective and systematic, and to raise funds for war and it’s empire.…

    • 719 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays