Away From Her And Bear Came Over The Mountain Analysis

1344 Words 6 Pages
Memories, with or without context, play a key role as plot devices in both Away from Her and “Bear Came Over the Mountain.” Used to provide context for their only semi-chronological story lines, memories in the story and movie alike give solid glimpses of the past that allow the plot to move forward. One of the most prominent memories, in both the story and the movie, and certainly the clearest of the latter, is the section in which Grant and Fiona go on a walk/ski in a park. The substantial differences between the scene and the passage, range from difference in dialogue to difference in visuals. This section is an excellent example of the drastic differences sometimes found in adaptations, and allows for the presentation of a case for the …show more content…
Because of this, the passage is allowed to remain a largely silent affair, free from any dialogue, while remaining rich in description. A detailed description that stands in stark contrast with the advanced state of Fiona’s disease. At the same time, the brutally barren landscape, void of any color or specific detail pairs well with Fiona’s Alzheimer 's, making clear comparisons between the devastating mental disease and a lifeless terrain. However, in the film, more literal discussion is necessary to allow the plot to move forwards. The conversation in the scene begins with Fiona declaring “when I look away, I forget what yellow means,” making an obvious reference to her Alzheimer 's, contrasting with the stories more subtle hints at Fiona’s state. Following this is speculation on the nature of a freshly sprouted flower, and whether she was correct or not being left up in the air with the words “can’t be sure if what I feel is the heat (of the plant) or my imagination,” leaving viewers in a similar state of uncertainty. Within the context of the film and story alike, the description and dialogue provide a look into the state of Fiona’s advanced state, in a way that essentially contradicts Grant’s doubts that stemmed from her …show more content…
The passage paints a picture of a dark sky, lit only by the light of the full moon, reflecting off of the snow. In describing the setting as “at night under the full moon,” with the additional detail of “the black-striped snow” Munro sets a scene that would seemingly be represented in black and white alone, whether by choice of the filmmakers, or the lack of viable palette variety. This passage could hardly be any more contrasted with

Related Documents