Group Threat Theory

2032 Words 8 Pages
The current study sought to expand the existing victim blame literature by investigating the effect of moral intuitions on blame attribution; specifically whether those who endorse the moral foundation of authority attributed increased blame to victims of police brutality. Within the current study’s liberal sample, authority endorsement scores did not explain a significant proportion of the variance in either victim blame scores, or police blame scores. However, blame attribution varied significantly depending on whether the victim was an in-group member or an out-group member, with greater blame attributed to out-group victims. The results regarding the effect of victim group size were equivocal. Victim blame did not differ as a function of …show more content…
A group threat perspective predicts that perceived threat is a function of economic conditions and the size of the subordinate group relative to the dominant group (Blalock, 1967; Schlueter & Davidov, 2013). Initial evidence in support of this model at the aggregate level of the city or county has associated an increase in minority population with increased attacks on minority groups (Green et al., 1998), higher negative attitudes towards minorities (Taylor, 1998). King and Wheelock (2007) provided the first demonstration that these area level associations are mediated by individuals’ perception of threat. Amongst white American’s changes in areas with an increasing African American population, African Americans were associated with threats to public safety and disorder, which were associated in turn with punitive attitudes (King & Wheelock, …show more content…
Such identity relevant information may be derived from instrumental judgements of the police. An instrumental perspective suggests that when the police do effectively protect particular communities, and when outcomes (e.g. quality of service, availability of aid) are not equally distributed, these communities may come to feel isolated from the wider social group that the police represent (Fagan & Davies, 2000). Aggressive police practices such as ‘stop-and-frisk’ (as well as physical abuse have frequently targeted Black individuals concentrated in areas of poverty, high crime, and physical disorder (Fagan & Davies, 2000). The perception of being ‘over-policed’ and ‘under-protected’, has led to sense of social exclusion among many Black individuals (Parmar,

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