Authoritarian Parenting Style Analysis

Decent Essays
Carly Wright
Authoritative v. Authoritarian Parenting Styles For centuries, parents have thought that being strict and raising their children to obey commands without thinking twice was the ideal and most effective way to parent. This parenting style has been coined as authoritarian (Baumrind, 1966) and the goal is to bring children up with high moral standing and quick obedience. However, studies over the last few decades show that children that are raised with these kinds of parents often suffer more harm than good. Instead, there is an increasing number of parents turning to a more modern parenting style: authoritative. Like authoritarian parents, authoritative parents expect their children to obey the rules and have high moral standards.
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While rules are strictly enforced, the rules are not always followed out of love. Children in these types of household follow the rules because they are afraid of their parents and their consequences. These children are motivated to comply with these strict rules and regulations because they fear their parents withholding affection towards them. Along with children being afraid of their parents, they are also afraid of not being loved and accepted by them. Authoritarian parents punish for even the smallest violation, and these punishments are usually not fitting and over-corrective. Furthermore, these punishments usually end up damaging the relationship between the parent and the child, as a result of withholding love and affection towards the child to punish them. Children, as a result, feel they earn love and respect for their obedience and quick compliance to rules, rather than for who they …show more content…
Feeling as if they are not in control of their lives, we come to a sense of “learned helplessness”. “Learned helplessness” is a key factor in depression. Because children are taught all their lives to make the right decision or be strictly punished, they internalize those morals and standards into their own lives and have difficulty getting rid of it even long after they have left their parents’ homes. “Learned helplessness” becomes so assimilated into our behaviors that it forever affects all different kinds of relationships and marital and parenting relationships are no exception. Even after children leave their authoritarian home, they often find themselves feeling anger and resentment towards their parents, although they are not generally authorized to demonstrate it. These negative emotions are typically expressed in a few ways, the most common being rebellion towards the parents themselves or someone of

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