Oppression Of Women In Aunt Jennifer´s Tiger's By Adrienne Rich

Improved Essays
The 1950’s era was a time where women’s lives were limited in almost every aspect. Housekeeping, raising a family, and obeying their husbands were considered ideal female roles during this time period. Women often felt trapped in the male-dominated world they lived in and society believed women fit this role. Although the women’s movement in the early part of the century allowed women to vote, they still had very limited options when it came to their careers or plans for their futures. Women were confined in the walls of their own homes. Society viewed them as obeying their husbands and taking care of their homes. The poem “Aunt Jennifer’s Tiger’s” by Adrienne Rich illustrates oppression and describes how a women is held back by the male figure …show more content…
The only role’s women’s were able to have, were to be mothers and wives. They had minimal say in their actions or lives considering their husbands dominated over what they could and could not do. Women were degraded by men to believe they were worth nothing, only worthy of bearing children or maintaining their households. Even though the women's movement in the early part of the century brought women the right to vote, women had fewer options in terms of careers and their family planning. This male dominance lead women to feel confined within the walls of their homes, unable to escape. Women were not financially independent even though they had jobs and replaced men during the war. “Men were expected to live public lives like working in factories or socializing in public places, while women were expected to live their lives at home taking care of the cooking, cleaning, and children” (Sailus, Christopher). Women were entirely shut out of the public unless they were accompanying their husbands. Their free time had to be related to maintaining their family’s needs. “Traditionally, women were defined knowledgeably and physically as the ‘weaker’ sex in all ways subordinate to male authority” (Marsh). Due to these expectations for women, they were also denied education or gaining any knowledge outside of their home, because it was a ‘man’s world.’ “Educating …show more content…
They had numerous reasons to feel angry, considering they had no control over their lives. They were isolated from many human rights and were not given anything in return even though they did contribute to society at one point. Women felt imprisoned and confined within their homes. They had to obey their husbands, raise their children, and do housework while their husbands went out into the public to work and live their normal lives. Women had limited options when it came to their future and unfortunately, society accepted it. “Aunt Jennifer’s Tiger’s” illustrates how a women is conquered and held back by the controlled male in her life. She recognizes that she cannot escape her controlled life or her husband but she uses her art stiches to illustrate the life she wishes to live one day, even if it is after her death. The brave and fearless tigers she designs is a symbol of the way she wants to view her life. Although it is only a fantasy, Aunt Jennifer dreams that one day she will feel free and when she passes, her tigers will continue to prance unharmed and brave. This poem reflects precisely what women felt and lived through back during this time

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