The Totalitarianism Of Augustus Caesar

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Augustus Caesar was successful and was not a dictator, but it is very easy to describe him as a totalitarian. Even though he loved his people and vice versa, Augustus’s used propaganda to keep the laws the way he wanted them. Augustus had a way of bending the truth and influencing the public with his words, for he “did not invent stories but he shamelessly embroidered them like a modern spin doctor" (Holland 2006). He spoke openly to the public very often and constantly informed them on the latest news in Rome. Of course, he made everything seem much better than they actually were. Augustus used poets, especially Virgil and Horace, to give himself power and keep his image bright. Poems made Augustus seem harmless even though he could do whatever …show more content…
He also went far enough to kill Julius Caesar’s 10 year-old son, and murder his best friend’s children. Augustus threatened those in politics many times because he hated having other people in power. He constantly replaced senators before they could make any political changes, and he threatened their families. At one of Augustus’s assemblies, a senator said “I would contradict you, could I do it with safety” (Forester 113). Even though political freedom seemed non-existent in Augustus’s rule, he was still praised by all and nobody seemed to want any change in politics. The Plebeian class already had no say in government before Augustus, so they all loved Augustus the way he was. Augustus built many temples and altars to the Roman Gods, and this alone gave many jobs to the lower class in society. Augustus was a hero to Plebeians, but he was also loved by Patricians. The Patrician class, especially the Senate, could still get by very happily if they just kept their mouths shut. Augustus genuinely believed that the smartest man was himself and he took his own advice. The only time he would ask for help was with war and money …show more content…
Under Augustus, the Roman Senate still had a big job, and they helped speak for the people. They mainly controlled foreign affairs, finances, and electing government officials. The senate also acted as a vehicle that carried out the authority of the emperor. This is very similar to the modern day Senate in the legislative branch. The Senate was supposed to have equal power to the emperor, but Augustus found a way to have more power than any other government position. He had bribed most of the Senate, and he used them to do any dirty work. The Senate still prevented Augustus from taking absolute power, and they let the people gave a say in government. Of course, the Senate could still control certain things that Augustus did not interfere with, and this gave the people some political freedom. Roman consuls, the chairmen of the Senate, controlled the military. Augustus primarily focused on controlling Rome itself, and he left most of the conquering to his consuls. The consuls also executed laws and they are the modern day equivalent to the executive branch. The consuls and senators were hand picked by the Centuriate Assembly. The Centuriate Assembly were citizen soldiers chosen by the emperor to be a voting group for life. The assembly also chose eight judges each year to run the criminal and civil courts. There were other

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