Brown's Theory Of Adhd

Better Essays
Attention deficit disorder (ADHD) is described in the DSM-IV-TR criteria (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) as a neurobehavioral condition that begins in childhood which can cause persistent inattention and/or hyperactivity. It is associated with poorer educational performance, social rejection and in adults increased employment and interpersonal conflict. Also, symptoms of this disorder are associated with conduct and personality disorders. Biederman (1998) stated; between 60% of individuals with ADHD will still be affected by the disorder and display symptoms in adulthood. Studies have found that individuals with ADHD have average or above average intelligence, but due to the nature of their difficulties it can result in them under-achieving …show more content…
This may be explained by executive functioning theory. ADHD is argued to be a disorder of the brains executive functions, and ability to self regulate. Brown’s (2005) model illustrates six clusters of impairments with executive functions; organisation, focusing attention, regulating alertness, managing emotions, use of working memory and emotional modulation. Thus, leading to issues with emotional regulation, motivation and time management; due to lack of memory and planning ability. Also, neurobiological theories suggest dysfunction in the right inferior prefrontal cortex of those with ADHD; this area regulates behaviour and impulsivity (Aron, Robbins & Poldrack, 2004). Therefore, this theory suggests problems with social behaviour; which in turn will affect social skills. In addition, the self-fulfilling hypothesis (Merton, 1948); suggests a behavioural confirmation effect. This theory states behaviour is influenced by expectations and stereotypes, which result in the individual fulfilling these expectations in through their …show more content…
Burns & Martin (2014) propose due to emotional regulation issues individuals with ADHD may struggle with adapting more as this is a necessary skill for adaptability. Shaw, Stringaris, Nigg and Leibenluft (2014) found emotional dysregulation is present continuously throughout the lifespan of an individual with ADHD. Also, they associate emotional regulation issues with deficits in attention to emotional stimuli, which are linked with dysfunction of the striato-amygdalo- medial. They conclude, emotional dysregulation is a main symptom of ADHD. Although, Maedgen & Carlson 2010 found difference between subtypes; ADHD-I didn’t show evidence of emotional regulation problems, whereas ADHD-C did show evidence emotional dysregulation; displaying high amounts of both positive and negative

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    These are explanations for the development of depression and a relevant impact of the learned helplessness on preclinical research (Hankel, Bussfeld, H.-J., & Hegerl, 2002). When experiencing these feeling individuals may also feel lonely and tend to isolate themselves from others (Hammond & Romney, 1995). Summary and Conclusion Depression is the second leading cause of disability (Ma-Li & Licinio, 2001). This is something that could happen early in childhood and continue to plague the individual into adulthood. Child maltreatment and traumatic events in early childhood can lead to lasting mental health issues (Danielson, et al., 2010).…

    • 816 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Central Ego Case Study

    • 1431 Words
    • 6 Pages

    This directly affects emotional conflict regulation and can potentiate the impulsive behaviors that correlate with BPD symptomology. Other neural networks affected include the insular and cingular cortexes that can affect how intensely people feel emotions (Etkin, Egner, Kalisch ,2011). The mood instability seen in BPD often leads to depression in where neurotransmitter systems are dis-regulated affecting the output of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine (Siever, Davis,…

    • 1431 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    (“How Learning and Attention Issues Can Cause Trouble With Making Friends” [Understood for Learning & Attention Issues], 2014) There are many conditions that individuals coexist with ADHD. Many of the individuals with these conditions also have ADHD. Some of the conditions are: (a) learning disabilities, (b) anxiety disorder, (c) depression, (d) bipolar disorder, (e) Tourette’s syndrome, (f) Tic disorders, and (g) sleep disorders. (“ADHD by the Numbers: Facts, Statistics, and You” [Healthline], 2014) These co-existing disorders dramatically impact the individual’s quality of life in their own ways. Children with ADHD that is left untreated are often wrongly judged as troublemakers, causing problems for them socially and…

    • 1649 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Trauma In Adolescence

    • 900 Words
    • 4 Pages

    According to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, neglect, physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, are all factors that can cause abnormal development of the brain. This abnormal development can even include a variation in the size of specific parts of the brain. A traumatized person may begin to have problems arriving at conclusions and/or considering different outcomes without the ability to abstain from some level of irrational behavior. They may even experience similar troubles while trying to learn new skills, processing new information and overall memory. These abnormalities can follow a child through adolescences and into adulthood.…

    • 900 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Informative Speech On Adhd

    • 1367 Words
    • 6 Pages

    HE HE HE ADHD Do you feel like you have the inability to remain focused, impulsive behavior, hyperactive, cannot follow instructions, depression, talk a lot, and just feel different than anyone else around you. Well if you answered yes to most of those, then you might have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). ADHD is a neurological disorder that can cause hyperactivity, impulsive behavior, and short attention span in children (‘’Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ,ADHD, in children’’). ADHD is the most common neurological disorder in adolescent, people should know what ADHD is, the statistics, causes, symptoms, what is it like to live with ADHD, and some extra facts. First of all, What is ADHD?…

    • 1367 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    If the child is not born with the mental illness, they can develop it through experiencing a phenomenon of a traumatic incident. For example, social isolation and childhood trauma appear in affect of presynaptic dopaminergic function. Childhood adversity is a state of serious difficulty or misfortune which is also relative to how they may experience EOS. Exposure to domestic violence or living with another person with a serious mental illness can contribute to developing schizophrenia. This can relate to the Little Albert experiment that was conducted in 1920 using a classical condition theory that represented a 9-month-old infant that was examined based on his reactions to various stimuli’s.…

    • 1557 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Neuroticism is a dimension of temperament that can potentially play a role in disorders. Barlow and colleagues (2014) provide an understanding of how neuroticism plays a role, through the triple vulnerability theory. The theory incorporates: General Biological Vulnerability, General Psychological Vulnerability, and Specific Psychological Vulnerability all interacting in the development of an emotional disorder (or neuroticism itself), particularly anxiety and mood disorders. Neuroticism is defined as the tendency to experience frequent, intense negative emotions associates with a sense of uncontrollability in response to stress (Barlow et al. 2014), in other words the inability to cope.…

    • 1124 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Arguments Against Adhd

    • 1668 Words
    • 7 Pages

    More importantly, cases of ADD/ADHD are often misdiagnosed; hence, there are several instances where medications are prescribed for children who may not be ailing from ADD/ADHD. While it is true that ADD/ADHD is a severe illness whose impacts can be severe, there is the need always to make an appropriate and reliable diagnosis before children suspected to be ailing from ADD/ADHD are put on medications. Statistics from empirical research point to the fact close 40% of children are more likely to be wrongly diagnosed with ADD/ADHD. Similarly, children are two times more likely to consume ADD/ADHD medications even in cases where they are not suffering from the condition. On another note, ADD/ADHD is often confused with immaturity in development.…

    • 1668 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    According to National Institute of Health’s Center for Disease Control Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a brain disorder marked by an ongoing pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development. This disorder is most common in children, and it can last until early adulthood life. Children that have trouble focusing for periods of time can also be a symptom of ADHD, which can lead to difficulties in school, at home, or with friends. Some other examples of ADHD symptoms are daydreaming, losing things, fidgeting, talking too much, making careless mistakes, having a hard time resisting temptations, having trouble sharing, and having difficulties becoming friendly with other acquaintances. ADHD symptoms can change over time as a person ages depending on what type of ADHD the person is diagnosed with.…

    • 2182 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In the United States, 2.7% of adults meet the criteria for borderline personality disorder. BPD is a serious psychiatric disorder characterized by impulsivity, suicidal thoughts, difficulties regulating emotion, and unstable interpersonal relationships. This disorder is difficult to diagnose, and even more difficult to treat. Treatment usually consists of psychotherapeutic and medical treatments which can prove to be expensive, lengthy, and may not always work. In recent years, researchers have tried to find better solutions for treatment by looking at the cause of BPD and attempting to narrow it down to one intrinsic root.…

    • 809 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays