Attachment Theory In Middle Childhood

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The middle childhood includes ages between of 6 and 11 years which is crucial phase of development of cognition, emotional, and social behavior of an individual. The transition from early childhood to middle childhood displays modification in psychological world of the child. Middle childhood is a period where children acquire skills, and abilities for developing healthy social relationships and imbibe roles that will lay foundation for a lifetime. These Children gain in their height, weight and also experience the loss of deciduous teeth and the eruption of permanent teeth. This stage marked by crucial shift in cognitive skills that occurs at around age six and progress in learning and understanding about Social Surroundings. They identify …show more content…
It provides description for lifelong social, affective, and stress response patterns that are procured during childhood. Attachment theories discuss the salience of human relations that are internal of an evolutionary-ethological background of adjustment and species continuity. John Bowlby (1973, 1988) described that an attachment system is emerged to regulate the sense of security and protection through stimulation of the individualistic biological system of attachment. With recognized threat, this system enhances the opportunity of survival by initiating closeness to preferred individuals. Attachment is the regulator of the child's affective and physiological reaction to stress and social support when needed. The attachment theory concepts involve the internal working models. They are the mental representations organized from childhood stage that contribute explanations for continuity. These structures direct the perception and expectations, affect and behaviors, physiological responses, and cognitions of an individual (Bowlby, 1973). The previous experiences result in various types of attachment styles. The traditional attachment style is classified into two types, 1) Secure and 2) Insecure patterns ( i.e avoidant and ambivalent style) (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters & Wall, …show more content…
Erikson’s theory and Attachment theory help in understanding the behaviour of pupil in Middle childhood. According to Erikson theory, Industry versus Inferiority occurs during Middle School age. During this stage the pupil start to acquire new skills and try to master the skills that elders, such as parents, should identify and recognise them. According to Attachment theory, during Middle Childhood, friends, and parents fulfil the child’s attachment needs such as security and protection, and parents also acts as the main source of social support. An economic disparity such as poverty has a serious effect on the physical health development of the child. The empowered parents can play a crucial role in providing a comprehensive health care .Overall, it can be concluded that the social factors (i.e economic disparities) and Psychological stress has negative impact on the healthy development of the

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