Essay about Atlanticas

2517 Words Apr 25th, 2015 11 Pages
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INTERGROUP RELATIONS AT ATLANTICA’S FLIGHT CENTERS

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Rick Oberweis stood on the observation deck of the Prudential Building, gazing through the plate-glass windows at the city of Boston spread below. It was a Sunday afternoon, in the fall of a year which proved turbulent for Rick, and he came to the top of the Pru as he often did to gather his thoughts and take stock. Though he worked at a desk now, Oberweis was a commercial and corporate pilot for many years, and so it didn’t surprise him when—of all the landmarks to look at— his absent gaze came to rest on Logan International Airport, visible in the gray distance of Boston
Harbor.
Oberweis was director of Flight Operations for Atlantica, Inc., a
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Clawson, Associate Professor of Business
Administration. This case was written as a basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate effective or ineffective handling of an administrative situation. Copyright  1999 by the University of Virginia Darden School Foundation,
Charlottesville, VA. All rights reserved. To order copies, send an e-mail to sales@dardenpublishing.com. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, used in a spreadsheet, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of the Darden
School Foundation.

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Since Atlantica and Pacific each had its own flight department, one effect of the acquisition was that Atlantica got a revamped Division of Flight Operations, with two separate facilities: the
Eastern Flight Center (EFC) in Boston and the Western Flight Center (WFC) in San Diego. In the wake of a heavily leveraged acquisition, and wary of adding to its payroll with another layer of management, Atlantica simply decided that both flight-center managers would report directly to the company’s president.

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Senior management’s next decision, touted as a safety measure, was to reduce the mandatory retirement age at Flight Ops to 65. This forced WFC Manager/Chief Pilot (and formerly Pacific
Industries’ Aviation Director) Dale Moseby into his

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