Atlantic Surviving Anxiety Article Analysis

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In The Atlantic- Surviving Anxiety article it had several different view points throughout the article. The article began a young man Scott Stossel who suffered from a serious anxiety disorder. He went through several different coping methods such as therapy, drugs and alcohol but that didn’t seem to work for him. He also suffered from several different phobias in addition to his phobia of speaking in front of an audience. For a while he was mixing Xanax with either whiskey or vodka to help tame the anxiety of publically speaking in front of a crowd. Although he knew that mixing his medication with alcohol could cause serious affects, he claimed to only suffer from moderate anxiety for days rather than sleepless dreads for months. Scott was …show more content…
His great-grandfather was the dean of Harvard college but was also admitted to McLean hospital for suffering from acute anxiety. His mother who was an attorney, also suffers from the fear of heights, tends to avoid public speaking, terrified of vomiting, had panic attacked and several other disorder, much like Scott did. With so many health problems within his family Scott thought to himself “…maybe the generally unsettled nature of my childhood psychological environment—my mother’s constant anxious buzzing; my father’s alcoholic absence; their sometimes unhappy marriage, which would end in divorce—produced in me a comparably unsettled sensibility.” (Stossel, 2014) With knowledge about his family’s background, moved forward with the thought hat maybe his experiences and what he’s inherited is the only thing that caused his anxiety, perhaps history and culture played a role as well. Scott and his sister both attended a Episcopal Church when they were younger, their parents chose to hide their Jewish background from them until they reached high school. His father being a Jew and his mother being WASP, he claimed his background may have caused him to be an anxious person. Furthermore, Scott moves on form his family history to talk about his digestive problems that his anxiety gave him. He …show more content…
This study investigated the association between separation anxiety and actual separation events during the childhood years of adult patients with agoraphobia that may or may not also suffer from a panic disorder. To do this study, there were forty-two women participated in a long-term study, all the women had agoraphobia but some of them may or may not have had a panic disorder associated with it. Each participant went through an exposure-in-vivo treatment and were asked to follow up. The separation events occurred from ages zero to 18. This study found that individuals who suffered from childhood separation experiences and separation anxiety were significantly higher than in healthy subjects, however, a panic disorder and agoraphobia were not associated with each other. Although the study found that separation events within an adult was in fact related to the separation anxiety they suffered during their childhood years. The study also concluded that there was no correlation between the separation anxiety and panic disorder and agoraphobia. If a child experiences separation anxiety during their childhood years, it indeed plays a role with the outcome of their etiology in all

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