Athletic Trainer Relationship

Superior Essays
For centuries sports have been a major topic for all types of people. The athlete can be pushed and pressured by a crowd that includes the parents, coaches, and the fans. The athletic trainers know the athlete’s capability and what he can and cannot do . In addition the trainers have seen all types of injuries from a simple sprain to a major ACL tear in the knee. Also, they know how to treat and teach the patient how to successfully heal the injury as easy as possible. Even though coaches pressure the athletes to heal faster and get back on the field/court as soon as possible, they want their athletes to do their best at all times. Whenever athletic trainers and coaches or parents have conflicts in behalf of the anxiety and nervousness for …show more content…
Most parents dislike to be surprised, and if they are it can cause major problems in the relationship.The working relationship between coach and athletic trainer must be cemented in mutual trust and confidence that each is working for a common goal – a successful athlete. All too frequently, the athlete is placed in a position between coach and athletic trainer. The athlete and parents are forced to take sides and the coach/athletic trainer relationship becomes dysfunctional. This dysfunction in the coach/athlete relationship could possibly interrupt the entire program from attempting to reach its full potential. The coach and athletic trainer must try to aim to understand each other’s perspectives while working together as a team to make sure that the athlete’s safe participation. The article written by Dennis Read described the relationship between the athletic trainer and the athlete him/herself, parents and the coaches. Read explained how he has to keep the parents involved in everything that he does so they will not be surprised. Most parents show a lot of appreciation when the trainer does work for them and their children. Trust in a relationship has to be built over time. It is obvious that the coaches are committed to the success of their program. Definitely , the athletic trainer has the best mindset of the athlete in mind and this can sometimes force the unpopular decision that removes a player from a contest. Eventually, once parents become familiar with your role, it makes communication with the parents easier. Athletic trainers with the best parent relationship have experienced that injuries can raise anxiety which is valuable opportunity to be involved in the parents’ trust.Some of the most difficult situations arise when dealing with parents who are nervous of the healthcare system. “ Sometimes all we can do is make our suggestions, because it's ultimately up to the parents.” It shows how

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