Asses the View That the Introduction of Capitalism in Developing Countries Liberates Women…

846 Words Dec 12th, 2012 4 Pages
Asses the view that the introduction of capitalism in developing countries liberates women…

By taking different perspectives to approach the assessment that capitalism in developing countries liberates women, we can gain an insight of the arguments justifying the view and those opposing. This essay will proceed to demonstrate how the modernisation theory and marginalisation liberate women, and then add conflicting suggestions such as that of a Marxist Feminist.
Perhaps most significantly, modernisation theorists such as Walt Rostow blame internal cultural factors for women’s subordination in the developing world; it can be seen that in many cultures it is within the norms, values and customs of society to be patriarchal, causing
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Notably, the inclusion of gender in capitalist development policies may play a large role on the liberation of females in developing countries. Pearson notes that since the 1990s, major development agencies - such World Bank and International Monetary Fund have responded positively to the issues of women. Likewise, gender has been incorporated into the indices of multinational aid – the UK department for international development has considered women’s rights and status. Kilby studies ‘Micro Credit’ and suggests that of the 80 schemes he studied, there was a definite increase in mobility, respect, assertiveness and support.
However, there are opposing perspectives that we can view to assess the argument and give us an insight that capitalism has had not affect on liberation and in some case has had a negative effect. We may apply considerable thought to the view of Marxist-feminists such a Molyneux – she argues that many programmes and development agencies were keen to help and eliminate oppression through child marriage and lack of education, but did not provide change within the home. Elwood supports this by quoting: ‘women can fly to the moon but they still have to do the ironing when they get home again’. This can link synoptically to a feminist view on household oppression and gender inequality in the study of the ‘Family’ (Oakley) – perhaps this is a reflection of the parallel between the two societies?

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