Asian Immigrants 19th Century

Improved Essays
Asian immigration to Canada during the 19th and early 20th century provided multiple issues to Canadians. After the creation of the Canadian Pacific Railway, Asian labour was no longer perceived to be necessary for the country. Asians were then forced to compete with Canadians and would accept lower wages and standards of living. This, in turn, increased domestic unemployment rates and decreased the standards of life of Canadian workers. Although many other immigrants have arrived in Canada in its history, the shoulder of the blame during this time was given to Asian immigrants. Political leaders used this hatred to fuel their campaigns and implemented anti-Asian rhetoric to suit voters. Labour leaders as well did not agree with Asian immigration, …show more content…
In fact, labour leaders discriminated against Asian immigrants due to the economic impact they created after the creation of the North American railroads. During the creation of the Canadian Pacific Railroad, cheap Chinese labour was necessary for its inception. John A. Macdonald refused to build the railroad without Chinese labour to attempt to save money during its production (Holland, 2007, p. 158). Labour leaders did not have significant issues with Chinese labour until the completion of the railroad. Once finished the Canadian Pacific Railroad, Chinese workers were forced to find employment in Canada and compete with white workers. Eventually, reduced wages and an increase in unemployment occurred. Although many other immigrant workers contributed to this increase, Asian immigrant workers received the majority of the blame due to the stereotypes created by Canadians. Asians were seen as ruthless, undercutting Canadian workers, and was essential for the survival of white working men (Goutor, 2007, p. 554). Canada accepted many countries immigrants for labour, however, all of the blame was placed on Asians. The blame was in part due to Canada’s economic situation and current political agendas during the late 19th and early 20th

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