Star Of David: Anti-Jewish Stereotypes

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War is an opportunity for oppressors to systematically oppress marginalized groups by establishing discriminatory social structures and constructs. This is especially apparent in Hitler’s campaign against Jewish people shortly before WWII. He believed that the intermixing of Aryans and Jews would taint the blood of the Aryan lineage, eventually leading to the destruction of the human race. Anti-Jewish prejudice achieved a nationwide scale, such as the Nuremberg Laws, which forbade those of Jewish religion to hold German citizenship and establish relations with German people. Another example would be The Eternal Jew. This was a film created by Fritz Hippler as anti-Semitic propaganda. It was featured in an exhibit of the same name, which the …show more content…
These people harbor a wicked glint in their eyes as well as large noses that dominate their features, which was, and still is, a popular Jewish stereotype. The Star of David is also clearly visible in the foreground, further emphasizing how these people are Jews. A quote from the movie reads, “Among the animals, [rats] represent the rudiment of an insidious, underground destruction- just like the Jews among human beings” (Document H). The film compares Jews to rodents, arguing that the two share similar qualities such as greed and …show more content…
This is often accompanied by screams of pain from the learner, who eventually pleads the participant to stop. The role of the doctor is to encourage the participant to continue electrocuting the learner despite the complaints. This continues up to 450 volts, which is enough to kill a large grown man (Source D). Milgram’s Experiment exposed how easily one’s morals can be influenced by an authoritative voice. The results show that people often choose to do what they are told rather than what is right, which explains how the Holocaust was able to begin. Instead of considering whether it is right to boycott Jewish businesses and deny Jews the right to citizenship solely based on their religion, Germans carried out Hitler’s standards because it was easier for them to do so. When combined, these evidence suggest that war allows the privileged to dominate weaker groups. Such is accomplished by demonizing opposition and using the public’s fear to demand absolute obedience. War provides the desperation and panic that is crucial to the success of radical changes, which Hitler conveniently used to further his

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