Article Review: Who is the Macho Who Wants to Kill Me? Male Homosexuality, Revolutionary Masculinity, and the Brazilian Armed Struggle of the 1960s and 1970s

915 Words Apr 5th, 2013 4 Pages
The 1960’s and 1970’s were troublesome times for the people of Brazil. They were engulfed in a fiery sea of a military dictatorship, while also being introduced to many new and upcoming countercultures of tradition; with one of the most prevalent subcultures being homosexuality. James N. Green discusses how the resistance movements of the time were dealing with this subculture that opposed the “normal” masculine and political structures of the leftist guerilla lifestyle.

In Green’s article, “Who is the Macho Who Wants to Kill Me? Male Homosexuality, Revolutionary Masculinity, and the Brazilian Armed Struggle of the 1960s and 1970s,” he discusses the “tensions between the non-normative sexual desires of members of the
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Were the Brazilian leftists homophobic? The Brazilian left was extremely critical and traditional when it came to culture. They shared five ideological frameworks: (1) linked homosexuality to bourgeois behavior, (2) medical and psychiatric ideas that homosexuality was a type of physical and emotional degeneration, (3) relied on the traditional Catholic teachings that considered homosexuality to be a moral abomination, (4) Anti-imperialist sentiment associated homosexual behavior and criticisms of homophobia with foreign influences, (5) rejected male homosexuality because it implied the feminization of masculinity and disrupted a pervasive construction of revolutionary masculinity that was at the core of militants’ self-image (pg 450). Frameworks one and five where used and talked about the most after this list. Does that mean that Green found a connection to his argument? According to a vision shared by several communists groups, the Cuban Revolution, and guerilla organizations, that “homosexuality was a product if bourgeois decadence and would disappear with a socialist revolution,” shows that there was a speculation that homosexuality existed and would go away. The personal memoir of Herbert Daniel shared a strategy that helped help cope with the leftist homophobia, by simply ignoring it and having the desire to be a

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