Sickle Cell Anemia Causes Red Blood Di

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Sickle Cell Anemia is a blood disorder that causes red blood cells to become misshapen and not live as long as a regular blood cell. Sickle Cell is a disease that is not very common in the world. In the United States, Sickle Cell Anemia affects between 70,000 and 100,000 people and occurring in 1 out of every 36,000 births. Sickle Cell is more likely to occur in somebody from Africa, South or Central America, the Caribbean islands, Mediterranean countries, India or Saudi Arabia. The usual age that people who have sickle cell is around 42 years for males and around 48 years for females. Sickle Cell Anemia is a blood disorder that causes red blood cells to become misshapen and not live as long as a regular blood cell. This sickness is a genetic …show more content…
In the article How Is Sickle Cell Disease Treated? , Gary H. Gibbons states four ways to treat sickle cell. “All people who have SCD should see their SCD care providers regulary. Regularly means every 3 to 12 months, depending on the person’s age. The SCD doctor or team can help prevent problems by: Examining the person, giving medicines and immunizations, preforming tests, and educating families about eh desease and what to watch out for.” By seeing the doctor this often, the chances for getting infections decrease. With someone that has SCD, there spleen doesn’t work very good at all and sometimes it doesn’t work. Because of this reason, it makes it really easy for that organ to become heavily infected and infections for somebody who is affected by sickle cell anemia isn’t good at …show more content…
"Sickle cell disease." The Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, edited by Jacqueline L. Longe, 5th ed., Gale, 2015. Science in Context, ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?disableHighlighting=&displayGroupName=Reference&currPage=&dviSelectedPage=&scanId=&query=&prodId=SCIC&search_within_results=&p=SCIC&mode=view&catId=&limiter=&display-query=&displayGroups=&contentModules=&action=e&sortBy=&documentId=GALE%7CSUKWRU366338883&windowstate=normal&activityType=&failOverType=&commentary=&source=Bookmark&u=pioneer&jsid=22a76abd6c383276c027ddd9c255f1d1. Accessed 21 Nov. 2016.
Barrett, Julia. "Sickle cell anemia." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science, edited by K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, 5th ed., Gale, 2014. Science in Context, ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?disableHighlighting=true&displayGroupName=Reference&currPage=&scanId=&query=&search_within_results=&p=SCIC&mode=view&catId=GALE%7CAAA000056482&limiter=&display-query=&displayGroups=&contentModules=&action=e&sortBy=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644032025&windowstate=normal&activityType=&failOverType=&commentary=&source=Bookmark&u=pioneer&jsid=ed6b30a61ca65e320bc0a45224519e22. Accessed 21 Nov. 2016.
Gary H. Gibbons, M.D. "What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Sickle Cell Disease?" National Institutes of Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 20 Sept. 2016. Web. 19 Dec.

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