Integrating Technology In The Classroom: Article Analysis

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Article Critique
The integration of technology in the classroom has changed not only for how the instructors teach but how students learn within the classroom environment. Thus, problems still remain pertaining to how teachers integrate technology with significant instruction. The following paper is a critique of Chen (2008) article, “Why Do Teachers Not Practice What They Believe Regarding Technology Integration? The following critique will discuss the connection between what students are willing to learn versus the educator’s awareness and knowledge on how to use technological practices alongside traditional pedagogical methods due to teacher’s beliefs on deciding how to integrate technology in the classroom.
Theoretical Framework
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Irregularity ranked highest within the study however, a central plan was devised to establish policies influencing technology integration. The study was vital because it showed the invariable differences between teacher beliefs and integrated technology. The characteristics of teacher beliefs was a chief factor into understanding the “influence decision- making processes and teaching practices”. (Chen, 2008, p.66). The author details that although the characteristics of teacher beliefs is not a common concept it is however inseparably considered to be a subjective term when detailing teachers belief systems and how they make integrated decisions within the classroom …show more content…
72). Chen suggest that the participants should me more malleable in echoing their practices for educational reform. According to the author he cites that educational reform can encourage the participants in engaging students with problem solving activities, creative thinking and collaborative but a “culture emphasizing competition and a high-stakes assessment system can strongly discourage teachers from undertaking such innovative initiatives.” (Chen, 2008, p. 73). Contrariwise, the author addresses in the proposed study the importance of balance between teacher beliefs and technology integration. Chen (2008) denotes that the significance in addressing the measuring of teacher beliefs, acknowledges that “more studies should focus on how to develop methods or instruments that can help in the rigorous identification and evaluation of teacher beliefs”. (Chen, 2008, p. 74). The study also suggest that future studies should include detailed questions, documented examples on how teachers should integrate technology into the classroom. Future research such as this can produce solid and realistic suggestions that meet the wants and of most

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