Arthur Shawcross Case Study

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Classical conditioning Pierce to stimuli together repeatedly eliciting a specific response until the association between both stimuli is imprinted so much that only one of the stimulus is required to elicit the same response. People condition themselves in regards to certain tasks or routines to help deal with their emotion. Routine activities provide a sense of control over one's emotions and helps organize and dispel negative emotions. Serial killers like Arthur Shawcross are no different than the average person in this sense that they use routine activities to help gain a sense of control in their actions. Arthur shawcross was a man of routine engaging in similar activities to help him carry out his murders. Set routines and practices are the foundation of human nature creating order and structure. Understanding the background of a serial killer is important but often the most important information lies within the case and murder itself. Distinguishing elements like Modus Operundi and Personation can help indicate the type of violence that occurred, personation are details or actions that go beyond what is necessary. As Modus Operundus evolves that can indicate instrumental violence as it is what... …show more content…
Dealing with violent offenders is tricky in the sense that their crimes need special consideration the moral dilemma that is presented in in in such violent Acts brings out the use of two models in criminology and application of Justice number one being the Crime Control model which seeks to control crime and to eliminate the potential for Crime to be committed the other is the due process which is the “legally required procedure ensuring that a criminal investigation and the trial is conducted in a fair manner and protects the rights of the defendant” essentially it follows all the set procedures even if it takes longer (Goff,

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