Process-Analysis Of Art

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Process-Analysis Ever since I was young, art has always been my niche, the one thing that truly defines me. Crayons, markers, finger paints, anything I could get a hold of to create something. I started creating and I never stopped, thanks to my encouraging parents and teachers. I did not get what I needed in my early years of school so started learning how to draw and paint on my own. I taught myself every tip, trick, and technique I could; desperately trying to learn how to better myself. I would spend hours learning how to sketch out an idea, pick the perfect colors, and finally, paint. My mind is constantly flooded with images that are so vivid I can see them clear as day even with my eyes open. Some are like photographs that linger in …show more content…
Since people are surrounded by color they can easily tell when something doesn’t work, that is why the colors choices in a painting can bring it to life or destroy it. Picking colors can be difficult because there are so many to choose from, and I have had paintings turn out strange looking because I try to fit every single color the human eye can see in it. Adding all the colors also doesn’t help to convey what I what the mood of the painting to be. Cool colors (green, blue and purple) convey the feeling of being cold, sadness, and sometimes add an eerie feeling. Warm colors (red, orange and yellow) are the opposite; they give off the feeling of warmth, happiness or sometimes even anger. So I keep that in mind as I pick my colors. There are a lot of ways to pick colors, but personally my favorite is one that I recently learned about recently. For the painting use two analogous colors, which are colors that are right next to each other on the color wheel, and a complimentary color, which are colors across from one another, from one of the original two. This is important because it will stand out from the other two and will be used to draw focus to certain parts of the painting and add contrast. After I have I have picked the perfect colors I move on to the best and worst part, …show more content…
One of the greatest feelings is picking up a paint brush, swilling it in your paint and bringing the canvas to life. The other side to that is picking up a brush and staring at the canvas not knowing how to start. I eventually learned the easiest way to start was to separate the subject form the background and then only paint one. I feel this helps because it helps when figuring out what to paint first and I can focus in just a part of the painting. Then once it is finished I can begin the other part, or it is also a good stopping point or break. I prefer to paint the background first, this is because the subject is more important to me and I do not want to accidentally paint over it. Some may do it the opposite it just depends on what is comfortable to the artist. I always lay down a solid color for and then paint on top of it, avoiding my subject of course. Then I begin to paint whatever is in the background, starting with the biggest and working my way up to the smallest. I do it this way so any smaller objects won’t get painted over. It goes like this; I paint the sky, then the ground, then the trees, then the leaves. There is a catch to this method though; you can only do this in acrylic paint. Acrylic paint is usually considered cheap because it dries fast and hardens into a plastic like substance, so it can be hard to blend colors. That is why many prefer oil paint because it is very easy to blend, but it can

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