Arranged Marriages In India

1523 Words 7 Pages
The concept of love is something so simple yet very complex in its entirety. As a human population we go years looking for someone compatible enough to consider marrying. Sometimes we fall in love with our high school sweethearts and sometimes we are forced to marry due to unexpected pregnancies. Regardless of the circumstances or situation everyone needs another affectionate individual to rightfully choose as their spouse. However, in third world countries such as India sometimes the option to choose your desired spouse is not available. This research analysis will discuss the generalized notion of what love is and how it’s often misinterpreted. Then present a brief discussion about the arranged marriage prepositions many Indians live with …show more content…
Arranged marriage is a custom that approaches the institution of marriage as something completely satisfying for longevity. In the Journal of Comparative Family Studies authors Jennifer Bowman and David Dollahite produce an analysis entitled “Why Would Such a Person Dream About Heaven? Family, Faith, and Happiness in Arranged Marriages in India” that evaluates the importance of arranged marriages in the Indian culture. The article describes an arrange marriage as “the arrangement of a marriage exclusively by a third party (someone other than the couple getting married) or by a "joint venture" of the third party and the child/person getting married. The term "success" with regards to marriage is defined as a high degree of marital satisfaction, measured by the Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS) (see appendix)” (Bowman and Dollahite 207). This elucidates the preferential differences Indians have in describing how they’re joined in marriages. This article does a great job in explaining how arranged marriages in India affect the thought process of the Indian population in structuring their concept of love. While reading the article the authors also stated …show more content…
South, Katherine Trent, and Sunita Bose take on a different perspective as to why the mate selection process in India has been altered. The authors strongly believe that the factor of demographics gives way to the underlying connection as to why urbanization and modernization haven’t eroded the embedded process of marital dynamics throughout India. Statistical evidence shows that still in today’s time the practice of arranged marriages is the predominant option to bonding the kinship between two people. The article states “As indicated by the frequency distribution for marriage type, Indian women often have little say in the choice of their husband. Only about 5% of marriages are self-arranged by women with no input from parents or other adults. Thirty-seven percent of marriages are jointly arranged with parents, and in 24% of marriages parents make the decision but with the consent of their daughter” (South, Trent, Bose 229). With quantitative results rendering claims to the continued existence of arranged marriage it’s evident that these customs have been and still are socially

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