Aristotle's Definition Of Democracy

996 Words 4 Pages
In his work, Politics, Aristotle credits a city-state’s constitution as being its only enduring identity when he remarks “when the constitution changes its form, it would seem that the city-state too cannot remain the same” (1276b). Democracy is among the several different types of constitutions Aristotle recognizes. Democracy is what Aristotle describes as a “deviant constitution.” This type of constitution is deviant because it is for the benefit of the poor, but not for its common profit. Though democracy is the most moderate deviant constitution and arises from polity. City-states in which the poor, or those who do not possess much property, are in authority are defined as democratic. However, Aristotle tries to remedy this popular …show more content…
So, when the citizens who comprise the majority join forces into a singular unit, they are stronger together. After altering the traditional definition of democracy, Aristotle continues to discredit the notion that there is just one kind of democracy. “Laws, apart from those that reveal what the constitution is, are those by which the officials must rule” (1289a17). Because the same laws cannot benefit all democracies, a variety of constitutions arise. Also, the organization of offices is also part of a constitution’s …show more content…
The deliberative component deals with public affairs, the judicial component with deciding lawsuits, and the executive component with public order. Aristotle further elaborates on democratic justice. Democratic justice is equality for equals and inequality for unequals, because what is “just is just for certain people” (1280b16). Democracy “arose from those who are equal in some respect thinking themselves to be unqualifiedly equal; for because they are equally free, they think they are unqualifiedly equal” (1301a28). Aristotle concludes that democratic justice is based on numerical quality, not merit. Though the concept of proportional justice is enduring, the democratic constitution may undergo change, and this is what Aristotle next comments on. He states that they undergo change because of the “wanton behavior popular leaders who sometimes bring malicious lawsuits against individual property owners” (1305a20) which causes them to join forces and form

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