Justice In Aristotle's Virtue Of Justice

Good Essays
Aristotle’s claim is that friends have no need for justice; this passage will spell out this claim, provide the necessary information as to why Aristotle can claim this, and discuss what this implies. His explanation of justice is much different from that of Plato and Socrates, Aristotle’s predecessors. According to Aristotle, justice is not included in the list of virtues, yet, on the other hand, friendship is, and the logic behind this helps to further the idea that Aristotle wishes to convey. Justice, as viewed by Aristotle, is the whole or completeness of all eleven virtues. Friendship is not dependent on justice, yet is a necessary commodity when it comes to appearing as a just person. Aristotle has his own idea of justice and describes …show more content…
Though Aristotle is implying justice as a whole the fact that he states, “friendship is not only necessary but also noble,” helps to eliminate justice as a virtue. As stated by HUANG the virtue of justice comes from a willingness to do noble things. “Non-virtuous people occasionally make notable contributions to society, but they do not act out of noble character” (HUANG 267). From Aristotle’s claim that friendship is noble, one can perceive that an individual with no friends is not noble, and therefore eliminated from Aristotle’s list of virtues, is the virtue of justice.
Aristotle claims that friendship is independent of justice, because those that are in friendship must already be just. “As I argued in chapter one, for Aristotle the
Chief human good must be choiceworthy (haireton), and a life is choiceworthy only if
…show more content…
Much proof is evident, also, in the fact that Aristotle believes, “When people are friends, they have no need of justice, but when they are just, they do need friendship in addition.” Friendship is necessary to complete the wholeness of virtue, and it is the most important of all virtues, which supports Aristotle’s statement fully. The previous statement concludes that friendship is a necessary commodity when it comes to appearing as a just person, yet is not dependent on

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Essay On Virtue Theory

    • 1499 Words
    • 6 Pages

    While having no formal set of rules, Aristotle described Virtue Theory as a principle that allows us to put our attention not on other people, on actions, or consequence but rather on focusing on being a ‘good person’. He ultimately believes…

    • 1499 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Aristotle disagrees with Plato saying that because the Form of the Good does not explain or participate in physical events, it cannot be accounted for in human politics. This is an important background because it sets the stage for Plato’s idea of the common good and Aristotle’s response. Plato argues in the Republic that justice, understood as a virtuosity and…

    • 1264 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A virtue is not something as simple as a feeling or something one does for the day. Feelings are involuntary, and should not be praised or blamed or anything of the sort. However, virtues are worked towards, and should thus be praised. For as previously stated, virtue is behaving in the right manner, which one must do consciously. Aristotle’s views on ethics transcend time.…

    • 998 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He also argues that a completely ethical person will not be conflicted about his ethical choice, opposite of Kant, who thinks that a person can make an ethical choice while desiring the wrong alternative. In fact, he prefers that, because it shows that the person is doing his duty, not the action just because it makes him happy. Kant might defend himself by saying that it would be too easy for a person to succumb to selfish desires if he is gaining happiness from his virtuous acts, and any action is not moral if there are any external motivators, but I will show how this defense fails near the end of the paper. Kant and Aristotle have very different opinions on what makes a person virtuous and what defines a virtuous act. My thoughts on morality line up more with Aristotle’s.…

    • 1242 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Essay On Virtue Ethics

    • 970 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The good of man is a working of the soul in the way of excellence in a complete life” (Aristotle). While Aristotle focuses on ultimate fulfillment, he rejects the notion of pleasure, honor, or wealth as virtuous. These qualities border on the side of vices and are not considered to place value with regards to happiness. Virtue ethics is an excellent guide to allow personality, cultural beliefs, and personal views be pertinent in moral decision making while still being fulfilled and flourishing as a good…

    • 970 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    p143). Aristotle has kept it quite vague on how we should initially reach the good life, as there are no set guidelines, apart from using reason and becoming a virtuous person. Additionally, collecting virtues is not something needed for life (Grcic, J.2000. p128-287). This argument explains that, Aristotle’s functional argument is successful because his understanding comes from the belief that, everything works towards a purpose/goal and ours is to use reason to achieve Eudaimonia, the supreme good, essentially the good life.…

    • 1482 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This shows a key difference between the principle of utility, as an action isn’t required with Kant, they’re merely acceptable. The next underlying principle with Kant’s theory is the principle of humanity. This is put as, always treat a human being (yourself included) as an end, and never as a mere means. The term “mere means” relates to an individual’s autonomy coming secondary to yours, deceiving someone, or not respecting another person’s goals. “End in itself” would be the opposite, to respect an individual’s autonomy and what their trying to…

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Cognitivism Analysis

    • 985 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Kant trusted that profound quality did not lay on sense experience as Hume would recommend that moral sayings are determined through the earlier reason, as moral standards aren 't experimental like a utilitarianist would imply, however are vital truths for discerning creatures. Kant not just trusted that feelings had no part to play in the importance of "good" additionally in the route in which the "good" was realized. 'The cooperative attitude sparkles like a gem for its own purpose. ' - Kant. Kant trusted that indisputably the ethical good got from the absolute basic must be carried on simply out of 'obligation for obligations purpose, ' we ought to have no ulterior rationale to do good other than it being the best thing to do, feeling negates with this ethicalness.…

    • 985 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Happiness, Aristotle argues, is a complete and sufficient good (Aristotle 's Ethics). This means that happiness is desired only for itself, that the sake of nothing else is the reason for desiring it, that it is without evils, and it satisfies all desire. In this logic, moral virtue is not the end of life, that for which all is aimed, since misery and inactivity may accompany moral virtue. Thus, happiness is the best good. To be complete, happiness is an activity which involves both moral and intellectual reasoning.…

    • 1645 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He says, “all by itself it makes a life choiceworthy and lacking nothing” (Aristotle, 8). While this definition of a self-sufficient activity is very similar to that of a complete activity, the former can be synonymized as an activity that is final in a such a way that adding anything to it would not make it any better. Aristotle makes a point to distinguish his definition of happiness from some common misconceptions of happiness. In his distinction between happiness and the typically sought-after lives of pleasure, honor, and wealth, Aristotle draws attention to how these things cannot fulfill the aforementioned conditions for happiness. While these can be further examined, Aristotle’s main point is that these misconceptions are ultimately chosen for another end, which is happiness itself.…

    • 1843 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics