Aristotle And Aristotle: Aristotle's Theory Of Dualism

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Contrasting Plato’s theory of Dualism, Aristotle explains that the body and mind are one thing that cannot be separated. Aristotle claims that motion is eternal. Introducing us the idea of happiness, Aristotle questions what we do to make our life good or something that makes us be alive. He states that the psyche or soul part of our life like happiness consists a good life for humans. There are different phases/stages that composes our life. The most important part, the Sentient soul, has sense experiences. We feel desires and different emotions in the Sentient soul. However, Aristotle claims that emotions can’t be the only thing that fulfill our success. Once again, he points out that the mind and the idea (knowledge/science) to accomplish …show more content…
We have to learn how to control the appetites, desires, and emotions in the Sentient part of our mind. Sentient is part of our mind and soul that is good for human life. But for Aristotle, human life does not just compose of the emotions. Aristotle claims that the feeling part is just as much part of the human being as the intellectual part. He states that it’s not really human, unless it involves the functional part of the mind. Therefore, feelings have to connect to the mind.
To initially describe Aristotle’s basic theory of virtue, he questions how human beings produce a good result. Our goal is to find happiness and eventually find a good life. Aristotle introduces the term Practical Wisdom. Practical Wisdom explains that human beings know what the goal is, but the question is the mean or ways to approach to the end. We have to find the right plan or path to obtain the goal. In other words, we see the options and pick the better option to follow the plan and achieve in success. For Aristotle, virtue is the mean between the
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All Aristotle’s thoughts on virtue is analogical or equivocal, because there is not one specific meaning for virtue or courage. To overcome fear, we attain the excellence or virtue of courage. In fact, for Aristotle, there is excess and defect in regard to dealing with fear. We can’t just ignore fear to deal with it. Does that mean we can do whatever we want? No because that is an extreme. We can’t be foolish. So, we take baby steps, controlling fear little by little, and achieve our goal eventually. We find the half way point between being a coward and ignoring the fear. In that case, fear will sharpen our feelings. Yes, we are afraid, but we can control and direct the fear to accomplish

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