Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics

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Aristotle Ethics Paper Through Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle analyzes different values present in Greek society and how to seek goodness. Specifically, Aristotle advocated for specific virtues in order for individuals to attain complete happiness, eudemonia, by pursuing virtues like wisdom and courage. While pursuing virtues of thought and character, habituation and practical wisdom are important to acquire virtues to better society. Aristotle makes a stark difference between virtues and practical wisdom, but are both incredibly important while pursuing happiness, and are imperative for all Greek citizens to practice. Aristotle asserts virtue as a state of character. These virtues can manifest themselves in different ways, specifically through …show more content…
To become virtuous, individuals must use habituation to align their motivations to create a natural disposition to practice virtue. Since happiness is a disposition, citizens cannot be passive on their journey to be virtuous, as virtue is not fleeting, but an intentional endeavor. As individuals desire to become virtuous, they “…become just by doing just acts, temperate by doing temperate acts, brave by doing brave acts.” Being virtuous is not intrinsic, rather virtues are attained through individual habituation, and utilizing resources to improve character. With the goal of living a virtuous life, value acquisition can only be attained through deliberate decisions to find the best choice in the doctrine of the mean. The only way to assess the doctrine of the mean, individuals must employ practical …show more content…
After careful examination of human intentions and actions, Aristotle makes a convincing argument regarding the pursuit of humans to reach eudemonia. Since happiness as a disposition is the end goal, Aristotle effectively articulates strategies and avenues to live a virtuous life. The spectrum of virtue is incredibly convincing, as the same exact situation can happen, but the context and the individuals involved would significantly change the approach and solutions offered for each situation. The only way to address the differences is through analysis and introspection of the context. There are mild flaws in Aristotle’s arguments. Aristotle is somewhat ambiguous, particularly the characterization of individuals. Aristotle does not adequately address intrinsic motivations for action. Individuals should be more concerned for the betterment of others, not driven by a reason of the generosity virtue. Dedication to virtue could eventually lead to pride and hubris, and would not produce benefits for individuals or societies. However, the main scope of Aristotle’s view on ethics and character development rings true. Aristotle’s emphasis on practical wisdom based on life experience is also a convincing indicator for life decisions. Aristotle effectively argues utilizing virtues, along with practical wisdom, in tandem, marks the journey to

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