Aristotle's Virtue

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There are three bad shapes of character: vice, incontinence, and brutishness. Contrary to these are the virtue, continence, and superhuman virtue.
A virtuous person’s wishes are aligned with a reasonable rationale so that virtuous act is satisfying and leading to happiness. According to Aristotle, one of an essential condition for a person to be virtuous is that he takes pleasure in acting virtuously. Whereas, a continent individual acts according to virtue and does so for the right reason but his desires are wrong. A virtuous person desires and actions are aligned along reasonable motives leading to happiness. On Aristotle view continence is sometimes a necessary evil. According to him, the need for continence is something that goes with
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I do agree with Aristotle that living virtuously is the path to happiness. The actual issue is the lack of right perception of virtuosity. The general perception on the idea that happiness is based only of living virtuously is different from the vision of Aristotle.
Aristotle defines virtue as doing everything to the right extent. If something is done beyond the extent, or when we face excess of some characteristic, we are exclusive of virtue and will not be contented and vice versa (Peters, 1893). I believe that this is absolutely right.
One of the challenges to Aristotle’s view is our religion, Christianity. Christianity has a strong influence on our image of virtue. It is thought that virtue engages people in denying themselves the pleasure of the flesh. It embraces fasting and abstention from sexual relations. It also entails being humble and accepting the others audacity. Our perception of being virtuous is based on the fact that a person should compromise on his present by being miserable for a better rewarding next world. This perception is not similar to the vision of
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According to Aristotle it is fine unless and until done to an extent, which totally makes sense. Only some people would consider consuming alcoholism as pleasurable whereas, in the long run if taken too much would cause sickness, nausea and passing out situations. Aristotle believes that basically there is no activity or a personality trait that can make a person happy if he consistently did that activity too much. I totally have the same opinion. Thus, if we comprehend virtue approach of Aristotle, we should be able to agree to the thought that contentment consists of living

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