Arguments Against Segregation In Schools

Superior Essays
Schools in America's southern states were segregated in the late 19th century following the passing of laws directed against blacks, these laws were known as the Jim crow laws.
Segregation meant that Black students were sent to different schools than white students. This was unfair because although the schools were meant to be ‘equal’ the black schools received less public funding than white schools, therefore they did not receive the same standard of facilities, For example the white schools would get more modern toilets and better textbooks, standard of education or learning materials.

Segregation in schools is an injustice because it violates the American Constitutions Thirteenth Amendment(1865), Fourteenth Amendment (1868) and Fifteenth
…show more content…
the aim of this association was to stand up for colored rights, fight for integration and stand up against discrimination. Beginning in the 1930s the NAACP began fighting the Jim Crow laws in the supreme court by striking at where the laws where the weakest - the field of education. The most notable of these cases is the Brown vs the Board of Education (1954 - 1955). This was not 1 but 5 separate cases tackling segregation within the education sector. On May 14, 1954, whilst delivering his verdict, Chief Justice Warren delivered the opinion of the Court, stating that "We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." This meant that segregation was illegal and must be stopped. The judge didn't say how it was to be stopped, instead leaving it up to individual states to work out. Olivia Brown and 12 other negro parents brought a case in the US District Court against the Topeka Board of Education which provided separate schools for Negroes and whites. At first, The Negro parents were unsuccessful. The judges in the District court decided the present law in kansas should remain. Linda Brown would still have to make her long journey to the all - Negro

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    “In Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954) a unanimous Supreme Court declared that racial segregation in public schools is unconstitutional. The Court declared “separate” educational facilities “inherently unequal.”( “Board of Education of Topeka”,khanacademy.org). With that, this paper has shown the many different sides of how Plessy v. Ferguson was the true beginning and end of legal…

    • 1264 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    According to BillofRightsInst, A man named Thurgood Marshall Argued that the segregation of schools violated the 14th amendment which states that, “No state shall… deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of laws. Several different segregation issues from around the country got combined into one case. The case from Oliver Brown, a 3rd grade African American student from Topeka, led the list. Linda was denied acceptance into white schools close to her home, therefore she was forced to attend a school miles away. Thurgood Marshall argued that the white school a way higher quality school then the blacks, but it really wasn't in Topeka.…

    • 1066 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It’s scary to think that only 61 years ago, American schools were still racially segregated, and African American children were kept away from white children. Earlier in 1896, a Supreme Court case called Plessy v. Ferguson made segregation legal as long as the facilities were equal (McBride). In the middle of the twentieth century, many people were working together to challenge these segregation laws. A man named Oliver Brown was one of the many people who challenged segregation laws when he brought the Topeka, Kansas school board to court. Brown v. Board of Education took place in 1954, and surprisingly, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Brown.…

    • 1660 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This resulted in racial disparities in housing policies and education. In 1896 after the ruling of Plessy v Ferguson, the federal and state government allowed the segregation of African Americans in schools, housing, public facilities etc (Garcia-Bedolla, 2016e). In addition, African Americans were discriminated under the excuse of the “separate, but equal” doctrine (King, 2000, p. 141). Thus, Plessy v. Ferguson legalized racial segregation and discrimination in the American society. When the government promised equal education for all, this did not include African Americans, as a result many African American organizations like the National Association for Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) started advocating and working towards segregation of schools because to African Americans, education was a route to citizenship and freedom.…

    • 644 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Supreme Court compromised by taking the Briggs VS Elliott case to court because of the racial conflicts in schools. The Briggs VS Elliott case was pointing towards justice for African American children in the state of South Carolina. It was a lawsuit that was turned down numerous times, but it eventually went through. Schools in South Carolina advanced in making the schools equal and free of segregation. The Briggs VS Elliott case was the first step towards desegregation in schools…

    • 976 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    On May 17, 1954, nine justices from the United States Supreme Court declared that the legal sanctioned racial segregation in public schools is a violation of the US Constitution. (SouthernSpaces). Segregation of schools was no longer legal, and the African American children had the right to go to any school that white children attended. In their minds this was wonderful but they didn’t think of all the trouble that it was going to…

    • 926 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Segregation was illegal due the fact that it wasn’t required by state law and due to the fact that there was no valid educational justification for segregation. Many court cases came about due to the fact segregation was illegal now. In 195, the case of Hernandez vs. Texas U.S. Supreme Court recognizes Mexican Americans as a separate class for Americans who face discrimination; this led to the MALDEF in 1967.MALDEF deals with cases of civil rights activities; it had major implications for financing of schools across the country. Mexican American was finally recognized as an identifiable dominated group in the public schools due to the MALDEF. Mexican and Puerto Ricans demanded for public schools for more resource in the bilingual education.…

    • 1441 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Plessy V. Court Case Study

    • 1776 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The Browns took their case to the Supreme Court. According to landmark cases.org “The Court decided that state laws requiring separate but equal schools violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.” The Majority Opinion was that “separate but equal” facilities are inherently unequal. In Plessy the court had looked at tangible things like transportation, buildings and teacher salaries. In Brown, the court examined the subtle intangible effects of segregation in public education such as making blacks feel inferior. Many schools were separating children solely based on race creating inferiority.…

    • 1776 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (1954), was a landmark case, impacting the public school system with making segregation within the school system a violation against the law. It showed how separate but equal no longer make sense in America. Leading up to the groundbreaking court case, the country was divided by segregation. In the south, there were Jim Crow Laws and the white population trying to limit the power the African-American had within the community. While in the north there was a large migrant of American Americans looking for a better life in the larger cities.…

    • 1561 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Board Of Education 1954

    • 1080 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In 1896, this case went to the U.S. Supreme Court and it upheld the constitutionality of segregation by the separate but equal rule. In 1892, The African American train passenger Plessy refused to sit in a Jim Crow car; Homer Plessy was breaking a Louisiana law. Plessy took the problem case to the court and claimed the law violated the 13th and 14th amendments by treating Black Americans inferior to whites. According to Telgen, the case came before the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled 7-1 votes, the court majority ruled that the state required separate accommodations for the races but the accommodations were equal (Telgen, Pg. 13).…

    • 1080 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays