Arguments Against Bilingual Education

Bilingual education has been a very controversial topic since the 1970’s when the civil rights movement had already passed and the thought of integration was becoming more welcoming. However, there have always been some people against the bilingual education movement and the implementation of programs in the school systems. The views of the American people have always been important because we live in a country where the voice of the people is what makes up the country. For that reason, the voice and opinion of the American people in regards to bilingual education is extremely important. But what is it that people actually think about bilingual education? Do the American people agree with it or are they against it? Those who may be against …show more content…
According to James Crawford’s: Why is Bilingual Education so unpopular with the American Public,” the Clinton administration became active in promoting bilingualism and programs such as “two-way bilingual instruction” for students with limited English. It seemed as if a new era was among us and the acceptance of multi-linguistic students was going to change the education world, as we knew it. But the plan did not go as well as most educators would have liked because in 1998, California voters approved Proposition 227 which was to dismiss most of the bilingual education programs in the schools. This was enormous deal, especially when Arizona and Massachusetts decided to follow in those same footsteps. Now it would seem to most people that three states would not make a huge impact on the nation, but due to the high volume of English Language Learners, making up 43%, it did make for a drastic change. Crawford states that due to this, the Bush administration proposed and Congress approved the No Child Left Behind Act in 2002. With this it gave schools the flexibility with funding English-learners programs but it required many provisions and mandatory English testing’s that would leave some states discouraged and uninterested in supporting native-language …show more content…
In 1998 the Public Agenda did a survey that imposed the question “ Should public schools teach new immigrants English as quickly as possible even if this means they fall behind, or teach them other subjects in their native language even if it means they will take longer to learn English?” 67% of parents overall in a public school said that a new immigrant should learn English as quickly as possible. 73% of immigrant parents expressed the same view with only 33% in favor of bilingual education programs. The shocking part was the fact that most of the immigrant parents were more likely to vote in favor of English instruction than that of their native language. Now why would that be? Most of the immigrant parents who came to this country believed that the way to get ahead was to speak English and blend in with the American people. Most wanted to have the American Dream and came to this country for a better life, wanting to leave their old life behind them. That also includes their native language. To immigrant parents, bilingual education is just another way to have their children held back because they will not be mainstreamed and included with the other English-speaking children, which is why they put a stronger emphasis on their children learning English rather than learning the subjects in their native language and transitioning to English. Little did they know that their

Related Documents