Animal Experimentation And Research

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Animal Experimentation and Research Common sense seems to dictate that the aim of medicine, vaccines, and surgeries are to improve our health, reduce and manage our pain and illnesses, and hopefully to live a longer life. With man wanting to learn more about the structure of the human body, he began experimenting on animals since using humans was considered unethical. According to the Professors of Pharmacology Badyal and Desai, animals are used in experimentation primarily for education, research, toxicology testing, and pharmacological use (257). The controversial debate about animals being used in medical research experiments and education dates back to the 1600’s (Badyal and Desai 257). During …show more content…
Throughout history animals have played a vital role in how the medical field has progressed. The animal biology education teacher Nuno Franco writes that humanity has been using animals “as models of their anatomy and physiology since the dawn of medicine” (239). For many years now, most biology classes in high school and college dissect animals to learn about anatomy and physiology. For the group of people who support and are in favor of animals used in experiments, animal dissection is a great example of education as a contribution. There is no denying that the use of animals in experiments has brought about great beneficial discoveries. Badyal agrees by stating, “ The greatest drug discoveries in the 19th and 20th centuries were possible due to the use of animals. Over the last century, every Nobel Prize for medical research has been dependent on animal research” (257). These people believe that the many future discoveries in medicine depend on the continued use of …show more content…
On the other hand, this group wonders if there are any alternative methods that can replace the use of animals whenever it is possible. This group also believes that if there is a way that can limit the amount of pain and stress that an animal goes through, or even none at all during these experiments, shouldn’t we investigate and adopt this process? Doke and Dhawale, pharmacological researchers, agree when they write, “Alternatives to animal testing were proposed to overcome some of the drawbacks associated with animal experiments and avoid the unethical procedures” (2). W.M.S. Russell and R.L. Burch made the first proposition of alternatives clear in 1959 with their idea of the 3 Rs (Blakemore et al. 948). Singh, a professor of pharmacology, describes in his article what the 3 Rs are and what they

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