Argumentative Essay: The Ethics Of Factory Farming

Decent Essays
You’re holding a fat, juicy hamburger. Before you take a bite, think about the cow that was prematurely taken from life. The Bourbon-Lime Chicken you are about to devour; how exactly did she die? Those BBQ Baby-Backed Ribs, did you realize it actually came from a baby cow? We eat every day. It is so much a part of us we don’t think about where it comes from. We need food but is it ethically right to house animals in small quarters? Is it morally right to grow animals so fast that their joints give out? Factory farming is morally not acceptable because animals are imprisoned in harsh conditions, suffer mutilations and are a danger to human lives due to waste disposal and unclean factories.
Farm animals are immured in small metal cages and are
…show more content…
We eat every day. Factory farming is necessary to keep up with human demand, according to Benefits Of. It also provides a low cost for food production due to technology and chemical use. The rate of unemployment is up to five percent; factory farming is also a good place for employment. The population of the world has reached seven billion. The United States has a population of 308, 745, 538, the largest state being California with a population of 39 million people. All of these people need to be fed, and factory farming increases food production. Although the farms could help construct new communities, the waste they produce is imposing and often puts the community at risk. “Auschwitz begins wherever someone looks at a slaughterhouse and thinks: they’re only animals,” said sociologist Theodor W. …show more content…
When lagoons spill or overflow they emit microbes, such as pfiesteria piscicida, a pernicious organism that lives off the nitrogen and phosphorus, the gases produced by the fecal matter. A dairy farm can produce as much as 120 pounds of ‘wet’ manure a day, which is a close equivalent to the amount thirty humans could make in a day. Farmers need a place to store the excrement. They are allotted 1.5 acres per cow. Residents near cesspools breathe in the gases of the waste, that not only is insufferably foul, but also toxic. David Kirby writes about Helen Reddout’s experience living next to a dairy farm; states: “And the smell is like fermented sewage. It burns your eyes and coats your throat” (43). Health-related factors are even more prevalent inside the factories. Eric Schlosser and Greg Kinnear discovered ‘that there is a problem with fecal counts’ (Dawn, 187), meaning meats often test positive for fecal material. The factories and United States Department of Agriculture, USDA, ‘irradiate’ the meat instead of cleaning the factories. Irradiation is meat being subjected to gamma rays, which do not kill the microorganisms, but instead change the DNA. Escherichia coli, E. coli, is considered a main issue. Americans in 2006 panicked; when spinach from California was found to contain E. coli, killing an elderly lady and sickened many others. It was later found that the spinach itself

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Their bodies are not made for this type of “food” so this causes the cows to have chronic indigestion which leads to high methane emissions. Factory farming accounts for 37% of methane emissions. Methane has more than 20 times the global warming potential of CO2 (11 Facts about Factory Farming and the Environment). The process that breaks down manure also creates pollution. Bodies of water where they put all the manure are known as manure lagoons.…

    • 1590 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In fact, residents who live near factory farms are affected through the toxins that contaminate the air and their drinking water leading eye irritation, chronic asthma, bronchitis, diarrhea, spontaneous abortion,s birth defects, and viral and bacterial disease outbreaks. Half of all antibiotics manufactured in the United States are poured directly into animal feeds. The most commonly used antibiotics are penicillin and tetracycline. Widespread overuse of antibiotics is creating new strains of virulent bacteria whose resistance to antibiotics poses a great threat to human health. Doctors report that due to their uncontrolled use on factory farms, these formerly lifesaving drugs are often useless in combating human disease.…

    • 1011 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    There are many ways that animals such as cows, pigs, chickens and the like get abused in such horrible ways. They get crammed into very small spaces with no room to move, or sit down, and they even get skinned alive in some cases. It is horrible that people are so careless about how the animals at the factories get treated. It is as if the people who work at the Farm factories do not think twice about the possibility that animals have any feelings. These kinds of situations show how in this society, everything comes back to being about money.…

    • 1049 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Scientists have shown a correlation between the chemicals in the animals at factory farms’ waste, and the development of neurological issues. The fumes that are secreted from factory farms are found to be a link to depression, and high anxiety. Though, for pregnant women, the effects can be even more catastrophic. The CDC believes that after manure from a factory farm contaminated groundwater in Indiana, at least 7 miscarriages took place due to the intake of the water. In correspondence, typically, water with 10 milligrams of nitrate levels is considered dangerous; while, water levels near factory farms contain 300 milligrams of nitrate.…

    • 854 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These chemicals are then transferred to humans when they eat the meat of one of these animals. CAFOs have also been a cause for environmental concerns. When animals were let to roam around in the open fields, their waste was “regarded as a precious source of fertility on the farm” (190). Today, factory farm animals spend most of their lives up to their ankles in their own waste and “are one of America’s biggest sources of pollution” (190). Because there is no way to easily get rid of the waste, it becomes possible for…

    • 1141 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Symbolism In The Jungle

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages

    However, it brought a public breakout and they reacted with outrage about the filthy and fake meat but ignored the condition of the workers. Meat sales skyrocketed to the bottom.Sinclair also noted that "I aimed at the public 's heart and by accident I hit it in the stomach." The Government started to receive a boatload of mail and receiving calls to reform the meat-packing industry. President Roosevelt also brought Sinclair to the White House for a discussion. He also sent out a special commission to investigate Chicago 's factories.…

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    We encounter it every day in supermarkets, in fast food restaurants, and even in movie theaters. Factory farming is a major agricultural crisis brewing for the last twenty or more years, but today consumers have options to help stop it. While the food industry profits from animal cruelty and massive pollution, ordinary farmers are sunk further into debt. The livestock are loaded with chemicals and antibiotics, thus making it unhealthy for humans to eat. Finally, the food industry is defiantly hiring illegal immigrants for labor in order to avoid labor unions.…

    • 1075 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    That 's three times the amount generated by the country’s human population. In factory farms, the animal waste is usually stored in huge, open-air lagoons which are often the size of football fields. Not one, but several; and they 're prone to leaks and spills. Not only that, but to prevent the spread of disease, factory farmers give the agricultural animals antibiotics; and about 75% of it is left indigested in their urine and manure. Therefore, it leads to another complication that may contaminate crops and…

    • 2249 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This issue is also important because it goes to examine the lack of humane and responsible farming practices that occur in the United States. “According to data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the EPA, animal feeding operations produce approximately 500 million tons of manure every year, 15 with CAFOs generating 4716-60% 10 of this excrement.” (The Impact of Industrialized Animal Agriculture on the Environment, 2012). This is a complex and controversial issue that is hindered by lack of media coverage, apathetic politicians and corrupts international investigators. When it comes to pollution generated by animal waste and the overuse of antibiotics, many do not realize that this is also a health issue, as E. coli and other bacteria could easily contaminate our food. However, it is also tied into the aspect of animal welfare, because often times hundreds of animals are kept in such cramped and close quarters, disease runs rampant.…

    • 1245 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The spread of diseases and health problems are linked to animals being kept in horrendous conditions. This includes children dying of E. Coli, and it is outrageous that the companies responsible being allowed to carry on producing. It’s known that food with cheaper cost tends to be the dangerous food. Since, they are trying to minimize the cost of minimizing the cost of the foods that their animals are eating. E. Coli has been a trending disease and that is because a lot of manufactures assemble their products with corn.…

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays