Argumentative Essay: The Art Of Gangsta Rap

Superior Essays
Whether internal or external, many people suffer from all different types of problems and their coping mechanisms all differ. One thing people fail to realize is the effect that the arts can have on people. The “arts”, whether they’re music, literature or painting, all serve as escapes for individuals going through life’s constant problems. Few know exactly what the phenomenon is but, the arts have an odd way of not only linking people together in their pain or suffering, but also helping them become in tune with their surroundings. The late Bob Marley once said “one good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain”. This quote in particular can resonate deeply with people because of the mystery behind it. One of the biggest problems …show more content…
Gangsta rap, originating from the west coast wouldn’t be received with open arms by the American public. This new genre of rap was much more adult oriented and featured a plethora of expletives. Though the product was more edgier, the focus remained the same. Gangsta rap featured problems that continued to plague the neighborhood and the way in which these problems were presented rubbed a lot of people the wrong way. Gangsta rap became even more prevalent after the infamous Rodney King trials of 1992. When all the officers involved in the savage beating of Rodney King at a traffic stop a year before were acquitted of all charges, the black community exploded. For six days, Los Angeles, California became a war zone like no other. The situation in Los Angeles was so bad that officers actually had to pull units out of the area because they just couldn’t get the control they needed. This exact situation is what gangsta rappers were rapping about; the submissive black community had finally exploded. Controversial rap group NWA, an acronym for “N*ggaz Wit Attitudes” produced a song four years earlier titled “F*ck Tha Police” which would become the battle cry of the riots. In their turmoil, rap was able to band the black community together and again, a group of oppressed people were able to find comfort within the …show more content…
Though it’ll constantly be in hot water for something, at the end of the day, I feel as if rap is something that will forever be rooted in the black community. In a time of uncertainty amidst various issues in the inner city, rap was the “magic” that blacks were looking for. The movement not only drew people together in their sufferings but it also gave blacks a way to voice their frustrations and make money in the process. Yes people can say all they want to say about the negativity in rap, but I believe that rap was a positive for many people. Had it not been for rap, the black community could potentially have missed out on something that actually provided them with a sense of identity. Rap has benefitted me because growing up, I could at times relate to what some of the rappers were saying. Throughout my life I’ve seen some childhood friends go to jail for easily avoidable things, I’ve lost two people in my life to gun violence, and I’ve watched people I grew up with take paths that will eventually land them in either a cemetery or

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