Argumentative Essay On Vaccines

1584 Words 7 Pages
Argumentative Essay Part One: Vaccines Sitting in the doctor’s office, holding your precious child, the recommended immunization schedule is being explained to you. You can hear the doctor, but you are not really listening anymore. All of the information becomes gradually overwhelming when you think of them poking your daughter several times, injecting all sorts of foreign elements into her vulnerable, little body. You are pretty sure you received all of these vaccines when you were young, but are not convinced you are ready to submit your child to them. You thank the doctor for the information when she has finished, schedule the follow up appointment, and leave the office determined to find the exact purpose for these vaccines and if your …show more content…
According to Stanley A. Plotkin, “By the eleventh century there were hints in Chinese literature of the use of [smallpox] scabs [blown] into the nose to immunize against smallpox, perhaps based on observations that prior smallpox protected against subsequent exposure.” Today, we know that vaccines are made of the germs of certain diseases. These germs are weakened or killed however, so they should not cause serious illness. “Vaccines provide your child with the antibodies they need to fight off the serious illnesses for which they have been vaccinated” (Infant Immunizations FAQs). In the U.S., vaccines are put through years of careful testing to ensure they are safe and effective. There can be minor side effects, like any medication or medical procedure, but “severe, long-lasting side effects from vaccines are rare” (Six Things YOU Need to Know about …show more content…
They argue that since their chances to contract such diseases are already lowered, why “put a mixture of foreign DNA and artificial chemicals into a child’s body to prevent [them]?” Their decisions are based on their health at the time the vaccines are recommended and the frequency in which these diseases are contracted (Loftus, 34-35). Additionally, many diseases such as polio, measles, and tetanus have been nearly eradicated, so parents do not see the immediate need for these vaccines (Daley). They may put off the doctor’s advice or subsequent doctor visits. This leads to parents receiving powerful advice and stories from friends and family “whose children developed debilitating diseases from vaccines,” and they consequently rely more heavily on this information (Loftus, 35). Furthermore, parents may not receive adequate information from their doctor or know where to find such information. Parents “may not know when vaccinations are due, the importance of timely vaccinations, or where to go for well-child care” (Luman, 1217). When this information is not readily available, or explained clearly, parents may mistakenly miss or forget some immunizations for their

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