Piety In Socrates

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What is piety? A seemingly simple, yet complex question that as we follow in the discussion between philosophers Socrates and Euthyphro, provides us with further insight on the benefits of calling everything into question. This discussion begins with a satirical attempt by Socrates to explore and ultimately disprove Euthyphro’s ignorant claim of being wise in all such matters as the court and religion. Ironically enough, in the case we are presented with, Socrates is awaiting his own trial on charges of impiety and proposes this exact question to Euthyphro with a fascinated, yet doubtful degree of curiosity that Euthyphro in fact knows the answer and therefore reasoning for why he is indicting his own father. Through Socrates’s pensive questioning …show more content…
Sometimes, though, we discover that the truth of the matter is that there is no truth. However, I believe that in this specific piece of philosophy, the questions asked are not meant to be answered, but rather we are to question the answers that have been given. This is in fact, exactly what Socrates does. Socrates continually points out the inconsistencies and fallacies involved in many of Euthyphro’s statements. There is, futhermore, a very evident usage of irony in Socrates’ praises of Euthyphro’s knowledge of these matters, even requesting to be his disciple. An obvious message to the reader, Socrates does not actually plan to learn from Euthyphro, but rather to lead Euthyphro to acknowledgement of his ignorance through analysis and recognition of the faults in Euthyphro’s own arguments. However, it is important to recognize that Socrates does not simply point out Euthyphro’s flaws, but rather attempts to lead him to recognize his own flaws in his reasoning. Socrates urges Euthyphro to look more closely at the consequences of what he has claimed, a sign of an experienced and respectable teacher. Still, by the end of their dialogue, the readers are no closer to a definition of piety, so what is to be learnt for the audience? Perhaps it ends so swiftly and with so much inconclusiveness to urge readers to think more independently and form more sound, supported …show more content…
Plato’s main goal here as a teacher is to teach us, and it is evident that he firmly believes that knowledge only comes when we can justify our own beliefs in the way that he handles this specific case with Euthyphro. For this reason, the dialogue form of this piece is ideal for readers to analyze and learn from. The true nature of piety, perhaps, may not be defined. Although this theory leaves Euthyphro’s justification for his father’s persecution unacceptable, it also leaves us with the affirmation that application of careful techniques of reasoning such as the Socratic method can and should result in progress to the resolution of a philosophical

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