Nationalism In Canada

Great Essays
Nationalism has a particular impact on the diverse identities of culture and civilization. It has the potential to affect people in both positive and negative ways. Overcoming the adversity that comes with diversity is one of the key aspects of nationalism, it is up to the people of the land to conquer it or not. The first source expresses the loyalties that the speaker believes are important for people to support. This source might seem as though it is promoting a negative idea of nationalism through statements denouncing national borders and historical backgrounds; I believe it is endorsing the greatest form of patriotism. This source minimizes the differences in cultures and perspectives in the fact that the speaker describes them as …show more content…
This quotation highlights how the problems that come with various nations occupying a territory brings about resilience. This statement is true as there have been several times in history where the differences in society have been used to develop the country rather than hinder it. For instance in Canada, a country built on multiculturalism, it is simply instinctual that this diverse foundation remains. The clashings and struggles of various nations have helped shape a country that is greatly loved and respected, one that recognizes and accepts differences in culture, languages, and lifestyles. This source is conveying an aspect of nationalism that is present in Canada which is based on shared values and laws rather than ethnic or historical backgrounds, civic nationalism. This unification based on beliefs, on how things should be run led to the making of several legislations and laws that promote the tolerance and respect of various nations. These differing perspectives have had an impact on the Canadian lifestyle because they have molded and formed the way Canadians deal with conflict like the speaker says. Most recently, Canadians displayed the way diversity had shaped their mentality through the response when an immigration ban was placed on citizens of seven countries wishing to relocate to the United States, Canadians called to open up …show more content…
The illustrator chose the maple leaf precisely to represent the nation of Canada with the tears representing divides in the country. I think the cartoonist in this source is trying to demonstrate the extent to which diversity can harm a country. This illustration epitomizes how diversity can lead to the downfall of a nation rather than the success of it. In the case of Canada, the fractured leaf can be used to represent the relationship between the three founding nations and the conflicts between them. The Francophones, Anglophones, and Aboriginal groups have endured tensions between each other for centuries through segregation and oppression. In this source, it seems as though the author is using the bandage to represent the slow healing of the wound the disunity in Canada has created. The concerns that arise with the disunity are about the clashing of the various cultures as they often tend to go to disastrous extents before being able to come to a compromise. An example of this is the long wait Aboriginal people had to endure before they were able to receive an official apology on residential schools. Residential schools were government-sponsored religious institutions created to assimilate Indigenous children into Canadian culture. The making of these schools alone goes to prove the cartoonist’s point that because diversity exists doesn’t mean

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