Argumentative Essay On Media Screen Addiction

Decent Essays
Register to read the introduction… Author Nicholas G. Carr refuses media screen addiction claiming, “There's nothing unusual about this. We routinely become dependent on popular, useful technologies. If people were required to live without their cars or their indoor plumbing for a day, many of them would probably resort to the language of addiction to describe their predicament. I know that, after a few hours, I'd be seriously jonesing for that toilet. What's important is to be able to see what's happening as we adapt to a new technology - and the problem with the addiction metaphor is that it makes it too easy to avert our eyes (Car 2010).” Carr also goes on to express his observations on our personal responsibility in this condition he deduces that “The addiction metaphor also distorts the nature of technological change by suggesting that our use of a technology stems from a purely personal choice - like the choice to smoke or to drink. An inability to control that choice becomes, in this view, simply a personal failing. But while it's true that, in the end, we're all responsible for how we spend our time, it's an oversimplification to argue that we're free "to choose" whether and how we use computers and cell phones, as if social norms, job expectations, familial responsibilities, and other external pressures had nothing to do with it (Car …show more content…
Clinicians use the most recent diagnostic criteria published in scientific journal to diagnose media screen addiction.” Objective criteria are based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), which lists the symptoms of addiction for substance and gambling addictions. “The most commonly accepted current modern system of diagnosis is that published by the American Psychiatric Association, in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) This uses the term substance dependence instead of ‘addiction’ and defines it as follows: DSM-IV Criteria for Substance Dependence (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) A maladaptive pattern of substance abuse, leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, as manifested by three (or more) of the following, occurring at any time in the same 12-month period: Tolerance, as defined by either of the following: A need for markedly increased amount of the substance to achieve intoxication or desired effect.(b) Markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of the substance.(2) Withdrawal, as defined by either of the following: (a) The characteristic withdrawal syndrome for the substance. (b) The same (or a closely related) substance is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.(3) The substance is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than was intended.(4) There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control substance use.(5) A great deal of time is spent in activities to obtain the substance (e.g. visiting multiple doctors or driving long distances), use the substance (e.g. chain-smoking), or recover from its effects.(6) Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of substance use.(7) The substance use is

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