Juvenile Court System Research Paper

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Adolescents across the globe fall under the impression that teenagers are imprudent and go through a roller coaster of phases. When we think of the word “immature”, science doesn’t come to mind- when it should. Consequently, there are many circumstances that go unnoticed within our juvenile court systems when dealing with teenage criminals. To shed some light on this whole controversy, scientists and journalist across our nation have given valuable research on this subject. The NCCP(National Center for Children in Poverty) found that the majority of juvenile offenders in residential facilities had at least one mental illness, this included high aggression, depression, and anxiety. On top of the mentality of these individuals, according to one …show more content…
Therefore, extensive analysis is currently being pointed out to open our minds to maintain fair jurisdiction. With the final verdict, lives for that matter, being held in the hands of citizens who might be called upon jury duty, it’s their responsibility to carry as much information possible in the case they’re given. As much animosity we may feel towards juvenile criminals- especially murderers- I believe, based on research and statistics that juveniles should never be tried as adults.
Every year a crime is committed, a court room is filled, and nearly 200,000 juveniles enter the adult criminal-justice system. The majority of these crimes are non-violent, which really makes us wonder how these kids ended up in an adult prison, what happens behind the cold concrete walls, and where they go once they’re out. Writer of the Sacramento Bee article, “Kids are Kids- Until They Commit Crimes”(2001), Marjie Lundstrom, makes the assertion that because of the “youth violence scare of the 1980s” and the power given to prosecutors to charge juveniles as adults, juvenile arrest rates significantly dropped. Although

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