Argumentative Essay On Homeschool In Home School

1837 Words 8 Pages
Register to read the introduction… There is simply no supervision for parents, when dealing with GPAs. All a parent needs in order to make a child’s grade official is to have a notarized person approve the grades, but today, it is easy for anyone to become notarized, including the child’s other parent, or member of the family. This leads to an ultimate advantage for the child’s GPA and disadvantage when they are placed in the wrong school, once home schooling is no longer an option. Another issue that is no yet faced, is that test scores of home – schooled students are statistically higher in situations where parents are administering in contrast to those situations in which teachers administered the exam, proving that there is a bias that parents have for their children, leading to another unfair advantage for children who are home schooled, that will lead to an ultimate disadvantage for their future …show more content…
Every teacher in the United States, must be a certified teacher, or have graduated with a degree in the topic in which they are teaching. As stated earlier, there are states that do not require certification among home schooling “teachers.” This leads to the huge problem of allowing uneducated people teaching the youth of our country. The beauty of a traditional education is that even if a child might not respond best to a specific teacher during a year of their schooling, they are given a new teacher the next year. In the situation of home schooling, there is no diversity among the teacher. There is one teacher (if they can be called a teacher with out certification,) for as many years as the child is being taught. Another issue that comes from the result of home schooling is that the ability of a student to talk to a teacher, on a one on one level, is a skill that is developed from years of interactions with many different teachers. When a child enters a normal school environment, they have no idea how to talk to teachers, not only for grade inquiries, but for information that was not understood in the initial lesson given. At home, children are subject to a more loving environment, where there is no need to discuss grades, or not understood information, because when a child is taught one on one, the lesson goes at the child’s pace rather than the student. This leads to another problem among …show more content…
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