The Pros And Cons Of Electroconvulsive Therapy

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The electroconvulsive therapy has been one of the most controversial procedures in human history and is still performed, because of its effective treatment of depression and other mental disorders. The method of performance of ECT has changed over time, although its perception has not altered a lot. The influence of mass media, movies and books strongly determine the general public’s opinion about the electroshock therapy. Although the procedure has been performed since the late 1930s, its mechanism of work is still unknown and going though research. Due to that mysteriousness of action, the negative impacts and the ethical concerns of the treatment, ECT feeds the animosity of people and is often a subject of dispute. Different scientists and doctors debate about the effectiveness, adverse effects and morality …show more content…
In 1939 ECT was presented in the United States. When ECT was initially introduced, it was known as "electroshock therapy.” During the earlier treatments the procedure often led to fractures, such as broken bones, and dislocations, and to more severe cognitive adverse impacts due to the lacking knowledge about dosing parameters. In addition, there were no muscle relaxants to help controlling the rough convulsions, brought on by ECT. People then were unaware of the complexity and delicacy of the human mind and what effects such a treatment would have. In light of these facts, ECT is still viewed as a strongly controversial treatment in the contemporary psychiatry. (Kalapatapu, 2015) Even though electroconvulsive treatment is a questionable procedure, it has been used for years and its application has even expanded. In Scandinavian nations, for example, ECT is given on an equivalent level with medications and psychotherapy to patients. (Ottosson,

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