Aral Sea Disaster Case Study

1995 Words 8 Pages
In this paper I will attempt to examine the root causes of the Aral Sea disaster that implicate in ecological, societal, economic, and cultural environments throughout the time and space. This paper will challenge the traditional view of the Aral Sea disaster as of “natural”, but rather “crescive” and “constructed”. I will analyze the Aral sea disaster through the following lenses, first is political - harsh Soviet politics and transition to the market economy that had subsequently resulted in recession, second is socio-economic- impoverishment of the local communities, deterioration of health, and outmigration, and third is ecological - overexploitation of the sea, loss of flora and fauna, desertification, and etc. (Saiko, 235, 1998). Further, …show more content…
The Russian Empire’s nineteenth century aggressive geopolitical initiatives on collectivization set the historic regulatory context in which the decision-making took place (Timoshenko, 451, 2014). The order in which the local and the regional municipalities operated under Soviet rule, posed significant constrains to developing a comprehensive framework of sustainable development, and rehabilitation and restoration twenty years after catastrophe that still persists until today. Timoshenko in Is the Game Worth the Candle? mentions, “the State policies and their implementation were formulated and controlled by the central government, while republican and local authorities played a limited role in the process” (452, …show more content…
Needless to say, that environmental jurisdictions and regulations during Soviet era were almost non-existent; but moreover, there were few acknowledgements and/or signs of potential threats to the surrounding communities. Furthermore, the relaxed environmental policies and regulations in the modern day Kazakhstan reinforce and perpetuate the intensification of the Aral Sea disaster. It is evident that the socio-economic consequences of the Aral Sea disaster extended well beyond the geographic boundaries of the region; however, the focal point of the disaster had not been pronounced. Notwithstanding, the “creeping” nature of the Aral Sea disaster faced a multitude of regional and national legislations, regulations at the policy level, as well as international aid to rehabilitate the area; however, these ambitious considerations were bound to lack of autonomy and corruption within the

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