Aquinas 10 Commandments

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The argument Aquinas has that the 10 Commandments are not simply arbitrary commands of God, but rather are ultimately justified by Natural Law can be considered a fair statement to make behind his reasoning of it. Natural Law according to the Treatise on Law is a “certain participation in eternal law insofar as we have providence over ourselves and others and can order ourselves and others toward the good of our nature; the light of natural reason whereby we discern what is good and evil--which pertains to natural law--is nothing other than the imprint of the divine light in us.” Personally, I find it convincing but if someone doesn’t the evidence can be clear on why. Aquinas’s definition of a law is “an ordinance of reason for the common good, …show more content…
The 10 commandments were brought up from God, which based off the research I did about natural law it fits in the criteria which as stated before natural law is a principle or body of laws considered as derived from nature, right reason, or religion and as ethically binding in human society the commandments fits into the religion aspect of Natural Law. Aquinas defines a law as "an ordinance of reason for the common good, made by him who has care of the community, and promulgated." The commandments are for the common good. Not even one of the 10 commandments can be considered not for the common good because they’re not laws made to benefit one supreme being God made them for the well-being of all humans. Law must be reasonable to all and the commandants were made to benefit all so therefore they are considered justified by Natural Law. Even though the evidence is clear for the commandments to be considered natural law there are reasons that it can be argued that the commandments are not considered justified by Natural …show more content…
The 7th, 8th, and 10th commandments are commonly in modern day disputes in whether they are considered to fit in the natural law group. As the commandments are studied it can be seen that these may not necessarily be completely considered as a natural law they can be considered as a civil law because of the asking of the laws. The natural law is the universal law of human race for living well but the Ten Commandments is God’s main principles of natural law therefore Aquinas’s statements saying that the commandments are ultimately justified by Natural Law remain

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