Apple Vs. FBI: Do You Need Privacy?

1710 Words 7 Pages
FBI wanted Apple to help them unlock the iPhone. Currently, iPhone can be locked using four digits PIN, and Ten incorrect PIN will lock the phone and erase all the encrypted data permanently. Apple sells millions of iPhone every year, and their customers can be a good guy or maybe a bad one. That means a terrorist also can have an iPhone with strong encryption and proper system security implementation. When something bad happens or law enforcement authority wants to eavesdrop on a private conversation, or maybe want to collect data, strong encryption makes their job much more difficult. According to the “Apple vs. FBI: All You Need to Know” report in CNBC, "Law enforcement authorities say that encryption used by the likes of Apple makes it …show more content…
Apple helping FBI with one iPhone was just a slippery slope because Apple pointed out that NY alone has 175 iPhone that needs to be unlocked and the Government wants Apple 's help. In the court ruling process, earlier case ruling can be used as guidance for a future ruling. Once a court ruled one way, another court follows that as precedence. Apple does not want to set any dangerous precedents by creating a backdoor in iOS so that FBI can use that case as precedence to force other tech companies to cooperate with FBI in such a way which may not be in the company or their customers ' best …show more content…
Taking a chance on Government, giving them the backdoor to the systems, and allow massive surveillance, does that work? There are some people, when they are asked whether they care about rights to privacy or should they be concerned of Government surveillance, their typical answer is, they have nothing to hide therefore, they are not fearful of those so-called data collection, profiling, or surveillance. That argument is further enforced by this logic that the only people would be concerned of profiling or surveillance are the one who engages in illegal activities. The opponent of the right to Privacy always gives the argument that Government’s primary job is to provide protection to its citizens. However, for the sake of security and feeling do nothing to hide, does the invasion of privacy, weakening the security by creating a backdoor in the systems, or massive surveillance really works? No really. According to the “What the government should’ve learned about backdoors from the Clipper Chip” article in ArsTechnica, Whitfield Diffie, one of the creators of the Diffie-Hellman Protocol for secure key exchange, spoke to a congressional hearing against backdoors in the system and his main points

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