Apple And The FBI Case Analysis

874 Words 4 Pages
The feud between Apple and the FBI has received a substantial amount of media coverage lately. The legal arguments for each side appear to be equally laudable, which impelled investigate on my own. I decided to explore the question of whether or not Apple should produce a back-door to assist in the FBI’s investigation. The FBI, which initiated the debate, argued that Apple has to comply citing the All Writs Act of 1789. Apple refuses to comply stating that if the back-door was to be produced and fell into the wrong hand the nations privacy rights would be out risk. While the issue seems to be very compartmentalized it has national implications. The Apple and FBI feud represents the larger conflict of the clash between the necessary and proper …show more content…
This adds an interesting twist to the FBI’s intentions, if they could hack it without Apple knowing, then why show their hand. Although this conspiracy may have some validity it bears little importance. After examining the laws and the initial arguments I decided to find the potential solutions to the debate. This debate could turn out in numerous ways, but there are three main solutions. (1) The FBI can stand by their writ and wait for the court system to enforce it. Therefore, they will get the back-door and retrieve the needed information from the iPhone. (2) Apple can continue to refuse the writ and can counter argue that the writ was issued under false logic. Apple can bring up the idea I mentioned earlier that the All Writs Act of 1789 is outdated or they could argue that the back-door is too dangerous to create, then the FBI would have to hack it on their own. Lastly, (3) Apple can only comply if the FBI allows the oversite of Apple executives, therefore they would create the back-door and then immediately destroy it. The last option is most likely not going to occur simply because Apple’s main argument is based around the idea that the back-door is too dangerous. If I have understood the information that I have read properly, I would assume that Apple will win out over the FBI and will not have to …show more content…
I understand that Apple can refuse to comply, but can they legally do that? Can a writ be refused without punishment and then reissued? I would like to see how this plays out. The sources that I have examined only reaffirm my support of privacy rights. The debate between the FBI and Apple has national implication and needs to be solved properly, if the case is argued ignorantly it could set the precedent for numerous following

Related Documents